AwayGoalsRule Football Forum

The Internet's Finest Football Forum

Get moneyback specials on your football betting at PaddyPower


It is currently Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:55 pm

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Dan Brown's symbolic odyssey
PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 12:20 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 41339
Location: Cloud Cuckooland
Highscores: 3
Image

As the sequel to The Da Vinci Code - The Lost Symbol - goes on sale today, there is one symbol that is sure to loom large in Dan Brown's bank account.

No need to decode this one: $.

With best-seller status never in doubt, Brown has written another page-turner that takes his Harvard hero Robert Langdon on a life-or-death quest across Washington DC.

The location may have changed, but the template is largely identical to 2003's The Da Vinci Code and its predecessor Angels and Demons.

There's the zealous baddie, the brainy female companion, the secret laboratory, the race against time to decipher esoteric codes - and of course not everyone is who they appear to be.

'Delicious scandal'

There is a moment early on in The Lost Symbol when Dan Brown seems to comment on the fuss that surrounded The Da Vinci Code's fictional revelations about the Holy Grail and Mary Magdalene.

A woman at an airport tells Robert Langdon her book group had read his book about the sacred feminine and the Church. "What a delicious scandal that one caused! You do enjoy putting the fox in the henhouse!"

Langdon responds: "Scandal wasn't really my intention."

The subject of the new novel is the clandestine world of freemasonry in America's most powerful city.

While the book name-checks Masonic forefathers such as George Washington, Langdon on several occasions highlights the "misinformation" that surrounds the Masons.

One bizarre ritual he sees as "innocuous and symbolic".

Italics and flashbacks

It's hard to see anyone getting too upset at The Lost Symbol. The freemasonry plot is underpinned by wider themes of modern science and ancient mysticism.

What's likely to irk the reader most is the almost constant use of italics to indicate interior monologue. The first example occurs in the book's opening sentence.

Technobabble abounds, and there are wince-inducing descriptions such as: "The massive room looked as if a mad scientist had taken over a Walmart..."

Add to this some clunky flashbacks, and lecturing from know-it-all Langdon that is akin to being hit over the head repeatedly with an encyclopaedia.

But despite this, The Lost Symbol's 509 pages are a gripping read. Dan Brown has created a successful formula and he's stuck to it.

The Washington setting may not be as alluring as the Vatican or the Louvre, but Brown extracts enough history out of his landscape to make this a fascinating ride.

And he squeezes in plenty of contemporary references too: characters run Google searches on their BlackBerrys, text on their iPhones and one jokes about the "Twitterati".

Such is Brown's visual writing style, the feeling as you close the last page is not that you've read only the novel, but that you've also just watched the film.

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImageImage

ImageImage
Quote:
Goodnight, thank you, and may your god go with you


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dan Brown's symbolic odyssey
PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 1:45 pm 
Offline
Major
Major
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 2:26 pm
Posts: 2762
Location: Belfast
Highscores: 4
I thought Angels and Demons was cack tbh. The Da Vinci Code was a good read though.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dan Brown's symbolic odyssey
PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 3:00 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 41339
Location: Cloud Cuckooland
Highscores: 3
Author Dan Brown may have outraged the Vatican in "The Da Vinci Code," but his new book, "The Lost Symbol," is being welcomed by his latest subjects, the Freemasons. Skip related content

Brown's novel, released on Tuesday, again features the fictional, mystery-solving Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, with the story taking place over a 12-hour period in Washington.

But while the fictional story lines about conspiracy and the Catholic Church in "The Da Vinci Code" caused an uproar among some Catholics and drew censure from the Vatican, a senior representative of the Freemasons in Australia called "The Lost Symbol" the work of a "terrific novelist."

"We are very pleased, there is nothing in this book that will offend my organisation. It does give us the opportunity to open it up a bit," said Greg Levenston, Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory for the Freemasons.

Levenston said the Freemasons were so excited about the book that they started a book club which will meet next week. "Of course the first book we are reviewing is The Lost Symbol, I think it's a wonderful start," he added.

Levenston was speaking to Reuters at a launch event in Sydney for the book, which will have a global English language first print run of 6.5 million copies -- the largest ever first print run by Random House, a unit of German media group Bertelsmann AG

Some booksellers are hoping "The Lost Symbol," and other new releases from bestselling authors such as Michael Crichton, will help revive an industry hit by the global economic downturn. Brown's "Da Vinci Code" has more than 81 million copies in print since its 2003 release, topping international bestseller lists.

Levenston said modern Freemasons are not as secretive as their predecessors, but said secret handshakes and special words are still used to help identify members as "men of trust."

"The secret handshakes certainly do still exist, but we don't roll up one trouser leg any longer. In the old days it was seen as a symbol of humility not for anything else," Levenston said.

Levenston revealed 10 of Australia's prime ministers were Freemasons, as well as legendary cricketer Sir Donald Bradman and veteran actor Charles Tingwell, who died earlier this year.

The history of Freemasonry, a fraternal organisation, dates back to around the 16th century. There are approximately four to five million members worldwide.

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImageImage

ImageImage
Quote:
Goodnight, thank you, and may your god go with you


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dan Brown's symbolic odyssey
PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:11 am 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2008 7:11 pm
Posts: 5644
breakingintoheaven wrote:
I thought Angels and Demons was cack tbh. The Da Vinci Code was a good read though.


I actually preferred Angels and Demons to Da Vinci Code.

The Lost Symbol is Ok, quite enjoyed it but its nothing Special


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Dan Brown's symbolic odyssey
PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:17 am 
Offline
Private First Class
Private First Class
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:14 pm
Posts: 44
Highscores: 1
You can read Utd's defence easier :lol:


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron