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 Post subject: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 12:29 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:16 am 
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Amir Khan admits he may have to reassess his relationship with trainer Freddie Roach - after becoming fed up playing second fiddle to Manny Pacquiao.

The British boxer is considering the direction of his career following his comprehensive defeat to Danny Garcia at the weekend.

The 25-year-old was knocked out for the second time in his career with a fourth round stoppage by underdog Garcia during the WBA and WBC light-welterweight unification fight.

Khan says he is determined to reclaim both belts, but admits he will review his relationship with Roach - who also trains the Filipino superstar.

"I want someone who is with me all the way through, like my conditioner Ruben Tabares is," he said.

"It's hard when you're with Manny and have to be the number two.

"Every fight is a big fight for me, I'm fighting top-10 guys and so I need the best guys with me all the way through.

"Now is the best time to sort these things out and my team will talk things over with Freddie.

"There are a few things I have to change to benefit me.

"Maybe we have to see if I'm doing the right training and have the right sparring."

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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 11:06 pm 
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Froch vs Kessler

http://nirsportz.eu/stream1.html

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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:24 pm 
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Mayweather won last night.

I watched the undercard and then fell asleep before the fight.

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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 12:14 am 
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I saw 2 judges gave it to Mayweather by 4/5 rounds but one judge had it down as a draw.

Judges scoring in boxing really needs to be sorted how can you have 2 people saying it was a romp and 1 saying it was a dead heat.

By all the reports I've read Mayweather dominated every round except 2


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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 12:33 am 
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Bobby Hunter of Fight Score Collector put together his usual polling and gathering of media scores. It was 86-0 for Floyd Mayweather, with only one score (from Doug Fischer of The RING) closer than 117-111 (Fischer had it 116-113). Nobody had a draw. Nobody had it close. Average score? 119-109.

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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:07 am 
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The judge who scored it a draw was CJ Ross. Who before last night was most famous for being one of the two judges who scored it a win for Bradley in the highly controversial Bradley/PAC-man fight. She shouldn't be allowed to judge fights anymore, but lucky for her boxing is a mess and there's no governing body to so much as reprimand her. Look at her resume (
Click The Link...http://boxrec.com/media/index.php?title=Human:401615
)it's amazing how often she sees fights completely differently than the other two judges.


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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:04 am 
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It'a the same in the UFC, you get some absolutely crazy decisions from the judges in that too, they leave you wondering what fight they were watching.

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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Fri Oct 04, 2013 1:33 pm 
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One of the terrible things about the business of professional boxing is exemplified by the relative merits of Andre Ward and Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.

Ward is light years better as a fighter than Chavez. Ward is an Olympic gold medallist and a highly decorated, skilled professional who right now is no worse than the second-best fighter in the world.

Moreover, he's professional, dedicated to his craft and always magnificently conditioned, a guy who never needs a contract to be rewritten to cover him from a lack of training.

Chavez, by contrast, comes off as an entitled, spoiled brat, who expects to be taken care of because he has a famous last name.

But that famous last name helps Chavez in ways that Ward can't imagine. Chavez has clearly established himself as one of the most popular draws, both in regard to ticket sales and television ratings.

The weight debacle prior to his fight Saturday at the StubHub Center against Bryan Vera limited ticket sales to a disappointing 5,206, but the bout did a season-best number on HBO. According to Nielsen Media Research, Chavez-Vera drew 1.416 million viewers, the top-rated boxing match on cable this year.

Because Chavez can sell tickets and draw television viewers, promoters made farcical efforts to accommodate him from a weight standpoint last week, giving him a massive, and potentially unsafe, edge over Bryan Vera.

His name probably didn't hurt him with the judges, either, as he scored a questionable victory over Vera that few other than the three judges felt he deserved.

Ward, vastly better than Chavez in the ring, can only imagine what it would be like to have the sport's power brokers jump whenever he spoke.

But Ward (26-0) is in the strange position of being one of the elite boxers in the world, yet hoping to land a bout against Chavez, a far lesser fighter he figures to manhandle in the ring.

His plight hasn't been helped by his extended absence from the ring. When he fights Edwin Rodriguez in a super middleweight title bout on November 16 in Ontario, Calif., he'll have gone more than 14 months between fights.

After the signature fight of his pro career, an impressive and comprehensive stoppage of an overmatched Chad Dawson on September 8, 2012, Ward has been on the sidelines.

He had surgery to repair a rotator cuff injury that had been bothering him since he was a teenager. He also sought to break his promotional contract with Goossen Tutor Promotions.

Any momentum he might have gained from knocking out Dawson was lost with the lengthy time off. Fans have short attention spans and he'll have to remind them again of his in-ring greatness.

He's hungry, he said, to get back at it. You never really know how much you'll miss something until it's taken away, and Ward's champing at the bit to get back to boxing.

"I really love what I do and it was taken away from me by the injury," Ward told Yahoo Sports. "I battled back from the injury, but then I had some internal problems, issues with the promoter. It was the business of boxing that held me up. It's been a trying 12 months.

"But look at my body now: I'm not fat. I'm not out of shape. I've been working, and I think everyone will understand that and the fans will see that on November 16."

Ward argues that he is a bigger draw than he is given credit for and said he has a strong fan base in the Bay Area, where he lives. According to the California State Athletic Commission, the Ward-Dawson fight at Oracle Arena in Oakland, California, sold 7,611 tickets for a gate of $706,469, with 1,308 complimentary tickets distributed.

That's a pittance compared to what a Floyd Mayweather Jr. or a Manny Pacquiao might do at the gate, but that kind of a gate, particularly in a non-traditional boxing market like Oakland, isn't that bad.

He's never fought in Las Vegas, the nominal Boxing Capital of the World, and he hasn't attracted a turn-away crowd anywhere he's fought.

But Ward emphatically denied a commonly held belief that he's not a draw and has no natural fan base.

"If people are honest, they'll admit that I do have a fan base," Ward said. "Look at what we did in Oakland [for the Dawson fight], and that was not with some all-out promotion, where we were hitting everything. There weren't a million billboards out there. That was word of mouth.

"That came against a guy who is a good fighter, but let's be honest, Chad isn't really outspoken. I think we did a great job [selling the fight]. People turn a blind eye to that and say we can't sell. It's something some people are saying and others latch onto it, but I have a fan base here, and I go everywhere from here to the East Coast to the U.K., and I'm recognized and appreciated everywhere."

Boxing aficionados have long appreciated his skill. In the Dawson fight, he showed an aggressiveness and a killer instinct that wasn't previously seen much.

A lot of that was due to his right rotator cuff, which was torn when he was 16. It's incredible to think he won an Olympic gold medal and became arguably the best fighter in the world with a shoulder so badly injured he couldn't throw an uppercut without searing pain.

Ward put it off for years because he knew how complicated it would be.

"The rotator recovery is brutal and it's taxing and gruelling in many different ways," he said.

"I didn't want that, and there was no guarantee everything was going to go right with the surgery. This surgery was very complicated."

But it got to the point where he couldn't compete any more the way he wanted with the shoulder the way it was.

It will be a new and physically improved Ward who returns to the ring to meet Rodriguez.

If the repaired shoulder allows him to do things he couldn't do before and turns him into a finisher, then Ward may finally be able to put to rest the talk that he is not a draw.

Everyone loves a power puncher, particularly one with skills like Ward.

But Ward needs to get out there and take an active role in promoting his fights, just like Mayweather has done. Those who don't see it simply can't imagine the work Mayweather does by himself to sell his bouts.

Ward's biggest challenge now is to follow that lead.


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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:37 pm 
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Two weeks ago, reports emerged from tabloids that Amir Khan would be abandoning plans to fight Devon Alexander to set up a huge £125 million fight with Floyd Mayweather in the spring.

Though the initial report claimed the Khan-Mayweather would be confirmed 'imminently', it did come from the same place as last week’s claims that Lennox Lewis would come out of retirement to gamble his legacy against Wladimir Klitschko.

Though such a story was definitely jumping the gun, the possibility of Britain’s polarising former world champion Khan taking on the world’s pound-for-pound best has taken its first steps to becoming a reality in the past few days.

The first big sign was the announcement that Alexander would now fight undefeated compatriot Shawn Porter on November 30 in San Antonio.

Talks over Khan-Alexander were protracted to say the least. For months we had heard that confirmation was around the corner. First to headline a breakthrough card in Dubai and then, when that fell through, a more conventional card in New York.

But the tediously-long negotiations are over and it looks like Alexander’s camp ended them.

'The Great' wanted to ensure he had enough time to fight this year with a reasonably-sized pre-fight training camp. With just seven weeks to get ready, he gave up on Khan.

Which, in itself, is evidence Khan is holding out for something bigger and better.

But what could possibly be bigger, better and more lucrative than a pretty big fight for the IBF welterweight strap?

I’ll give you three guesses. And I'll be mystified if you need the second.

Floyd Mayweather will likely pick the opponent he views as the most marketable

Mayweather’s father and trainer Floyd senior added fuel to the fire by admitting he would love to see Khan step into the ring with his son – who notoriously takes full advantage of his position as the sport's best to hand-pick his opponents.

He said: "All those tough guys and champions that Floyd fought over the years. I think Floyd deserves an easy a** fight like Amir Khan. I want Floyd to tear his a** out of frame."

For the record, the biggest rivals to Khan's chances of being next for ‘Money’ are Alexander himself (the initial Amir-Devon fight plans were rumoured to decide Floyd’s May 2014 opponent); Timothy Bradley (who has beaten Manny Pacquiao and Juan Manuel Marquez); and as an outside shot, Danny Garcia (who knocked out Khan last year before proving his all-round skill against Zab Judah and Lucas Matthysse).

Mayweather joked to basketball star Kobe Bryant during a backstage meeting at a recent NBA game that he wants "one of those unbeaten studs" next. But, really, anyone who can be built up as having at least a glimmer of hope of 'cracking the code' will be sufficient to ensure another monster payday.

Yes, that includes Khan. And while British Mayweather victim Ricky Hatton admits he could see only one winner in that potential confrontation at his recent book signing in Canary Wharf, 'The Hitman' argued that few others would be able to at least make a fight of it, as he had done in 2007:

"I'll be made up if Amir fights Mayweather," Hatton told The Wharf newspaper.

"Mayweather is running out of opponents he's been that good and if anyone deserves a shot it's Amir Khan. There's very few fighters who can match him in speed.

"Normally people fly at Floyd but If Amir can jab, move and keep out the way and, if Floyd has to be the attacker, it could be different.

"I don't think he'll beat him and I don't think Amir will mind me saying that - I think most would class him as an underdog - but it will certainly be interesting if Amir swallows his pride for one fight and doesn't go to war. If he keeps his head and boxes you never know."

Bradley (here goading Marquez) could be Khan's biggest threat to a Mayweather fight

If Khan really is to stand a snowball's chance, he must at least be sure to squeeze in one more tune-up fight before 2013 is out.

His two fights in the last 12 months since reacting to the Garcia loss by switching from Freddie Roach to Virgil Hunter both showed glimmers of promise that Khan can fight a more mature, less naïve game. And yet, there were also plenty of obvious examples of the same old, same old.

Really, Khan needs another three or four 'safe' bouts to find his groove under Hunter. While nobody but the jealous will begrudge him 'cashing in' by signing up for near-certain defeat to Mayweather, he should at least step back into the ring once before then. Or else it’ll be 13 months between fights, considering Floyd has made Cinco de Mayo weekend his own.

The other suggested New York date for Khan in the event of Alexander moving on was the following weekend, December 7 – but that is now the 'battle of Brooklyn' between Judah and Paulie Malignaggi at the Barclays Center.

But the Brit really should find something, anything, to give his partnership with Hunter the maximum chance possible against Mayweather – even if that chance is not to win, but just to earn respect and an improved profile (not to mention the inflated bank balance) in defeat.

Until then, his next big battle is to make sure he beats the likes of Bradley and Alexander to the proverbial 'pay window' that is a meeting with Mayweather.


I know Mayweather is basically boxing for paydays and he knows that the fights in Britain bring in big box office sales but Khan would be massively out of his depth


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 Post subject: Re: 07/07/12 Boxing
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:11 am 
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If you want an idea of just how much damage boxing can do to a brain, do a quick internet search for Denis Lebedev.

After his fight with Guillermo Jones in June of this year, Lebedev became a fleeting internet oddity – the boxer with the elephant man’s face, the skin around his eye socket swollen grotesquely and his eyelids squeezed shut by the puffy, purple flesh around them.

It looks horrifying, but it’s mostly just soft tissue damage.

The real problem lies behind that soft tissue, and behind the bones of the skull, and with the brain, which is floating free in a suspension of cerebro-spinal fluid.

Newton’s third law of motion tells us that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Which means that for every blow that hit with enough force to make Lebedev’s face react as it did, there was a similar force shunting the brain backwards and forwards against the inside of the walls of the skull.

Last month, Timothy Bradley described what it feels like when a boxer’s brain is treated like that. After his brutal fight with Ruslan Provodnikov – following which he was taken to hospital – he told boxing broadcaster HBO that “A few weeks after the fight I was still affected … my speech was a little bit off and I was slurring a bit. After about two months, I got my speech back.”

Those effects on the brain are greatly amplified when boxers are dehydrating to cut weight: and dehydration is far more common than you’d think.

In January 2012, sports broadcaster HBO ran a short documentary about boxer Brandon Rios and his struggles with dehydration before his December 2011 fight with a British boxer named John Murray. Rios had been contracted to fight at 135 pounds and failed on three separate occasions to make the weight on the day of the weigh-in. The documentary follows the pre-fight interview with the HBO commentary panel in which Rios, despite hiding his face behind large sunglasses and under a heavy hoodie, looks pale, drawn and very unhealthy. In the interview, Rios’s trainer Robert Garcia said, “Normally fighters gain eight, no more than ten, and that’s normal for a fighter that loses a lot of weight before the weigh-in. But Brandon gained 20 pounds … it’s not healthy, it’s dangerous.”

Rios was stripped of his title for failing to make the weight, but allowed to fight. The dehydration had left him physically spent and he took far longer to beat Murray, turning the fight into a gruelling, blood splattering duel that inflicted far more damage on the two men than needed to be. The shocking images of Rios’ haggard dehydrated face, followed by its swift expansion to its usual roundness, and the subsequent goriness of the fight were presented by HBO with no real commentary on the prevalence of dehydration or its dangers, other than Garcia’s candid admission that his fighter had been in real danger.

In June 2012, Julio Cesar Chavez Jnr stepped onto the scales for his fight against Andy Lee weighing 159 pounds and looking skeletal. He later complained that he developed leg cramps half way through the fight, which many attributed to his efforts to make weight through dehydration.

Julio Cesar Chavez Jnr weighs-in (Reuters)

A month after that, in July 2012, Edinburgh’s Paul Appleby fought a fight he’d taken at six weeks’ notice and for which he had dehydrated severely to make the weight for. He lost the fight and felt so sick afterwards that he spent nearly a week in hospital before deciding to take a break from fighting (after which he decided to move up a weight division to avoid having to dehydrate so severely again).

Then in September, Rodel Mayol complained that he lost his IBF Super Flyweight challenge to Juan Carlos Sanchez because he had been dehydrating before the fight and suffered cramps before his ninth round knockout.

In December 2012, Manchester boxer Kieran Farrell nearly died after spending his training camp dangerously dehydrating before his fight with Anthony Crolla. After the fight, Farrell collapsed and was rushed to the hospital suffering from a serious bleed on his brain. He would later tell The Guardian that thirty per cent of his brain had been destroyed by the bleed, and he can never box again.

In May 2013, Hose Aguiniga pulled out of his fight with Francisco Vargas in Las Vegas when he collapsed, severely dehydrated.

These are just the cases that, briefly, broke into the public record. In truth, dehydration ahead of fights is now virtually universal in boxing. The advantages are obvious. A boxer who normally weighs, say, 180 pounds can train at that weight but fight at 168, with a potentially dangerous advantage over their opponent. All they have to do is strip out all their water weight the day before the weigh-in then try to pour it all back in before the fight. But it’s based on a flawed notion – that one can rehydrate as quickly as one can dehydrate. In reality, the body needs days more to fully replenish the stores of utterly vital water in the cells, muscles and organs. Multiple scientific studies in the past few years shows that a boxer who is dehydrated, even if he’s been drinking rehydration fluid for a fully day, cannot perform at the same level, and cannot defend himself properly.

No full record of boxers’ weights exists in the world but the unofficial reweighing done by HBO is a good sample – non-scientific but certainly sufficiently random – to highlight just how many boxers are now essentially cheating the scales. Nearly every boxer that agrees to be reweighed shows an increase in weight in the 24 hours between the official weigh-in and the day of the fight. The majority of boxers add on more than 10 pounds of weight in less than a day, all of which is in the form of vital hydration for the boxer’s body and brain.

The recent wave of recorded brain injuries in American football ought to serve as a parallel for boxing’s governing bodies to act upon. Various studies have shown that the majority of damage is caused by the kind of mild, repetitive and cumulative damage that is caused by repeated blows to the head. For a boxer who has been dehydrating, that damage is massively amplified but virtually invisible. It only raises its head intermittently in the likes of the cases above, and it’s often hard to prove unless the boxer himself admits to it. As with American footballers, the real results may only be seen when this generation of boxers gets much deeper into retirement.

All of the major sanctioning bodies have some form of prohibition on dehydration, so there’s an obvious acceptance that this is dangerous. Yet boxers continue to do it because it is not policed effectively.

The 24-hour weigh-in was designed to make boxing safe from a raft of dehydration related deaths and injuries in the 1980s and 1990s. It was a well-meaning but poorly executed rule which has only served to take that danger and spread it among an even wider number of boxers.

It’s time to dispense with the widespread fallacy that boxers can dehydrate safely and implement a set of rules that can stem the invisible tide.


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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2013 8:45 pm 
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http://boxingguru.tv/gurutv1.html

Groves vs Froch

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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2013 11:13 pm 
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Nice one idfd :thumbup:

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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2013 11:20 pm 
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I was up in my room streaming it. Come downstairs and my dads ordered it!

Froch should destroy him.

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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2013 11:51 pm 
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Groves knocks him down first round. wtf.

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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 12:24 am 
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Ref just stopped the fight. TKO Froch.

Groves was excellent. Ref had a 'mare there.

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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 1:59 pm 
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I think the ref stepped in a little early but I'm not sure Groves would've made it to the end of that round let alone 12.

What was incredible was Froch getting up in the first round he was all over the place deep breath and he was back in the room.

Hopefully they have a rematch as that was a great fight to watch.


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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2013 5:46 pm 
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Was Groves raped after the fight?

The way the ssn team are interviewing him you'd think so.

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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 11:23 pm 
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Mayweather today:

"I don't have an easy fight on May 3, 2014, so I can't over look Marcos Maidana but Amir Khan if you and Adrien Broner end up fighting each other on my show and you win (which you won’t)... I'll fight you."

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 Post subject: Re: Boxing Thread
PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 10:07 pm 
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idontfeardeath wrote:
Mayweather today:

"I don't have an easy fight on May 3, 2014, so I can't over look Marcos Maidana but Amir Khan if you and Adrien Broner end up fighting each other on my show and you win (which you won’t)... I'll fight you."


Amir's been well and truly, if you'll excuse the pun, conned. :lol:

He won the poll and gathered interest but Floyd just used it as a marketing ploy and went back on his word. Maidana is probably the easier fight for him.

In the meantime, Khan in all his greed avoided a fight with Alexander and eventually ended up missing out on the biggest payday of his life, whilst giving Floyd more publicity.

Mayweather is the ultimate businessman. :cool:

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