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 Post subject: Re: Playstation 4
PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:32 pm 
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Given the direction Sony as a company is heading in, they will be absolutely desperate for the PS4 to be a success (moreso than usual) as every other part of their business (afaik) is in a downward spiral and has been for a while.

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 Post subject: Re: Playstation 4
PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:41 pm 
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Reedo wrote:
Not sure Spawnfeatures should be allowed to comment on these kind of threads anymore.

Reproducing heathen.


Quiet you

:whip:

:p

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But James and Pak both said they were voting JSP


:doh:

You know what Paks like. He's probably voted JSP for woman of the year or something.


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 Post subject: Re: Playstation 4
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 11:08 am 
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Sony dives deep into the PS4’s hardware power, controller features at GDC

New tidbits on PlayStation 4 Eye camera and user interface as well.


by Kyle Orland - Arstechnica.com


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At a presentation at the Game Developers Conference today, Sony Senior Staff Engineer Chris Norden went into greater technical detail on some of the PlayStation 4's underlying hardware, including the PS4 Eye depth sensing camera. While all of this information is not finalized and subject to change, the presentation gave us our deepest look yet at Sony's next generation of console hardware.

Norden started by focusing on the chips, including the 64-bit x86 CPU that he stressed provided low power consumption and heat. The eight cores are capable of running eight hardware threads, with each core using a 32KiB L1 I-cache and D-cache, and each four-core group sharing 2MiB of L2 Cache. The processor will be able to handle things like atomics, threads, fibers, and ULTs, with out-of-order execution and advanced ISA.

Sony is building its CPU on what it's calling an extended DirectX 11.1+ feature set, including extra debugging support that is not available on PC platforms. This system will also give developers more direct access to the shader pipeline than they had on the PS3 or through DirectX itself. "This is access you're not used to getting on the PC, and as a result you can do a lot more cool things and have a lot more access to the power of the system," Norden said. A low-level API will also let coders talk directly with the hardware in a way that's "much lower-level than DirectX and OpenGL," but still not quite at the driver level.

The system is also set up to run graphics and computational code synchronously, without suspending one to run the other. Norden says that Sony has worked to carefully balance the two processors to provide maximum graphics power of 1.843 teraFLOPS at an 800Mhz clock speed while still leaving enough room for computational tasks. The GPU will also be able to run arbitrary code, allowing developers to run hundreds or thousands of parallelized tasks with full access to the system's 8GB of unified memory.

Speaking of memory, Norden hyped up the 8GB of GDDR5 RAM in the system as the type of memory that's currently usually found only on high-end graphics cards. Calling the RAM "expensive" and "exotic," Norden stressed that you "can't buy this [RAM] for 50 bucks... that's why high-end graphics cards cost as much as they do." The 176 gigabytes of total bandwidth provided by that GDDR5 RAM are much more efficient than the 40 gigabytes a second provided by the standard DDR3 RAM used in most current computer systems. The unified address space should also cause fewer headaches for developers than the mixed architecture of the PS3, Norden said.

The development environment coders will use is based on Windows 7 and fully integrated with Visual Studio 2010 and 2012, allowing developers to debug PS4 code just like PC code. Tools will include C and C++ front ends that are largely compatible with most standard compilers, and various binary utilities, including CPU and GPU analyzers that can run in real time alongside games. Development houses will also be able to distribute tool and version updates to multiple dev kits more easily through a tool integrated into Windows Explorer.

As for the physical hardware itself, the PS4 will have a Blu-ray drive that's "up to three times faster" than the PS3's drive and will include a "very large" hard drive in every system.

DualShock 4

The DualShock 4 controller that's standard on the PS4 eliminates one feature that was seldom used on the PS3—the analog face buttons and d-pad. While games like Gran Turismo 4 made use of this feature, most developers ignored it. Using digital face buttons on the DualShock 4 will allow Sony to "cut latency way down" for the new controller, Norden said.

For force feedback technology, the DualShock 4 has one small motor and one large motor, much like the DualShock 3. The new controller will let developers vary the analog strength of each motor, though, unlike the digital motors on the PS3, allowing for "more precise, cool effects."

The L2 and R2 buttons on the Dual Shock 4 have been redesigned to be more comfortable and to ignore accidental pressure when players place the controller down on a coffee table, for instance. The analog sticks have also been tightened, Norden said, for a reduced dead zone and better feeling tension that grips your thumbs. The touchpad on the controller will allow for two points of recognition at a 1920×900 resolution, which is pretty large considering the small size of the pad.

Norden also highlighted the light bar on the back of each DualShock 4 controller. The full-range RGB LEDs in each controller will light up blue, red, pink, and green to correspond to players 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The lights will also blink when the controllers are charging (which is now possible even when they are plugged into a PS4 system in standby mode) and turn off when the charging is complete.

Finally, the PS4 will include a mono headset and microphone in every box that plugs directly into the DualShock 4. The system is capable of streaming 32Khz sound to the controllers' speakers for up to 2 players, but that reduces to 16Khz when 3 or more players are hooked up.

PlayStation 4 Eye camera

The PS4 Eye seems like a significant upgrade from the normal PlayStation Eye that was used on the PS3. The two cameras inside the unit are each capable of 1280×800 resolution and 60Hz at a color depth of 12 bits per pixel. That resolution can actually be turned down to increase the response rate, so a resolution of 640×400 would get you an extremely fast 120Hz measurement. The camera's 85 degree field of view means that there will be fewer out-of-range problems with PlayStation Eye games, Norden said, while a four-mic camera array can provide directional listening capabilities.

Norden highlighted the PS4 Eye's ability to change things like exposure, white balance, and gain per camera or per frame, unlike the "one image" original PlayStation Eye. This can allow a developer to, for example, use one camera at low exposure to track the bright PlayStation Move balls, and the other at higher exposure to show a player that would otherwise look dark in a dimly lit living room.

The camera itself actually sports its own three-axis accelerometer, which Norden noted can be used to remind the player to change the orientation if it's not pointed correctly. In addition, the camera can be synced with the "game loop" clock so that images of players line up with the in-game action without lag.

In a quick filmed demo, Norden showed users flicking the touchpad on the DualShock 4 to create an augmented reality menu that moved along with the controller in the player's hands, and a modified pong game where the position of the players' controllers caused the playfield to move, morph, and bend. The cutest demo, though, featured a number of tiny robots trapped inside a virtual DualShock 4 controller, getting flicked out into an extremely sharp and responsive augmented reality environment as the player flicked the touchpad.

User Interface

Finally, Norden went in to a little more detail on the PS4's user interface. The system will be focused on providing users up-to-date information on all their games from a central menu, telling them about things like new DLC, social recommendations, and videos without having to boot up a game. The default home screen will provide a digest view of everything happening on a player's PS4 social network, displayed by default at boot up. The friends system has also been improved from the PS3, allowing for a higher maximum number of friends and improved multi-user support when a few PSN users are playing on one system.

Norden highlighted that the PS4 will use a dual identification system that uses both a "True Name" and picture alongside a PSN name and avatar. Your True Name will only be visible to friends that you add through Facebook or through True Name search, Norden said. Otherwise, both users have to mutually agree to share their True Names to see them. "It's kind of up to you how you want people to access your True Name" he said.

Sony also hopes that developers will integrate social features directly into traditionally single-player games. Norden gave an example of a Heavy Rain scene, where a decision between discussing something with your son or getting a snack was accompanied by a pop-up display showing how many of your friends chose each option.

To wrap up, Norden discussed the extra PS4 chip that allows for a constant storage of the last few minutes of video of your gameplay, without taking away power from the core CPU or GPU. This allows for easy sharing of awesome moments without advance planning, Norden said. It also allows for live streaming and spectating of every PS4 game without extra developer support, and for Remote Play on the PlayStation Vita, with a mirrored display that makes use of the system's full 960×554 resolution. That Remote Play will be possible over either a home network or the Internet, but the latter will obviously be highly dependent on bandwidth and latency, Norden said.

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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:56 am 
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Sony clarifies stance on PlayStation 4 'restrictions'


June 11, 2013 By Eddie Makuch - gamespot.com


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PlayStation maker confirms Online Pass program will not be continued on PS4 and that no "gating restrictions" will be in place for software.

Sony has clarified its stance on PlayStation 4 game "restrictions," after executive Jack Tretton said earlier today on Spike TV that decisions about DRM would be left up to third-party publishers.

In a statement sent to GameSpot, Sony confirmed its Online Pass program will not be extended to first-party PS4 titles and that no "gating restrictions" will be in place for disc-based games on the system.

"The Online Pass program for PlayStation first-party games will not continue on PlayStation 4. Similar to PS3, we will not dictate the online used game strategy (the ability to play used games online) of its publishing partners," reads a line from the statement.

"As announced last night, PS4 will not have any gating restrictions for used disc-based games," the statement goes on. "When a gamer buys a PS4 disc they have right to use that copy of the game, so they can trade-in the game at retail, sell it to another person, lend it to a friend, or keep it forever."

This plan differs from that of Microsoft, which has said that decisions about whether or not secondhand Xbox One games can be resold will be left up to publishers. In addition, secondhand Xbox One sales will be available only at unspecified "participating retailers."

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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:21 pm 
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Here's what YOU WON'T be able to do with your PlayStation 4

CDs? MP3s? Forget that, just stream from Sony


By Neil McAllister - theregister.co.uk





Automotive pioneer Henry Ford famously joked that any customer could order a car painted any color "as long as it is black." The same will be true of Sony's forthcoming PlayStation 4 video game console – "Jet Black" being the only color option at launch – but it seems the new device will come with plenty of other limitations, besides.

Sony has positioned its latest console against its arch rival, Microsoft's Xbox One, by claiming it wouldn't place as many restrictions on how customers play games as Redmond's product will. But according to a new FAQ published on the official PlayStation blog on Thursday, there are still lots of things you won't be able to do with a PS4, some of which you probably weren't expecting.

Just for starters, the PS4 is really designed for digital displays, so don't expect to plug it into that old CRT clunker in the basement. It has no analog output ports – just HDMI and optical audio out – and the lowest screen resolution it supports is 480p.

If you've had your eyes on an ultra-high-def 4K TV set, though, you'll still be out of luck. Sony says support for 4K gaming is "under consideration" but it has nothing more to say about it at this time.

Games that take advantage of 3D TV sets, on the other hand, are technically supported. But nobody has made any such games so far, and there won't be any 3D-capable games available at launch, so don't hold your breath for that, either.

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Sony's latest PlayStation is versatile, but it can't do everything

The PS4 comes with a built-in 500GB hard drive, and you will actually be able to swap it out for a bigger one if you choose – provided, that is, that it's a SATA II drive that's no more than 9.5mm thick. But if you were thinking of adding additional storage space via USB, forget it; external drives of any kind are not supported.

If you were thinking of picking up a PS4 as a general-purpose media device, you might want to think again, too. Sony hasn't done you any favors as far as making the PS4 the center of your digital living room.

OK, so maybe you didn't expect the PS4 to be able to stream content from your computer via DLNA (it can't). But did you expect it not to be able to play MP3s at all? Because it can't do that either.

It can play DVDs and Blu-Ray movies, but only after you download a massive 300MB software update and activate the video-playing capability over the internet. Or, because Sony is really serious about not requiring an internet connection for its latest console, you can call a toll-free number and have an activation disc sent to you by mail – just don't plan on watching any movies on Christmas Day.

Also, don't plan on playing any audio CDs. Ever. While the PS4's optical drive supports DVDs and Blu-Ray discs, it unequivocally cannot read audio CDs – the first time this hack has ever heard of an optical drive with this limitation.

That's probably because what Sony really wants you to do is join its Music Unlimited and Video Unlimited cloud services, which will launch at the same time the PlayStation 4 is released. Video Unlimited promises new movies before they're released on DVD and Blu-Ray. Music Unlimited – well, it lets you stream the songs from the CDs that the PS4 doesn't allow you to play.

But it's really all about the games, isn't it? Which in this case means PS4 games exclusively, because the PS4 doesn't support any PS3, PS2, or PSOne games. What's more, unlike all of those earlier consoles, all PS4 games will come on Blu-Ray.

Your PS4 has no love for most of your PS3 doodads

You won't be able to use most of your PS3 peripherals with the new console, either. The DualShock 3 controller and the PS3 Blu-Ray remote are explicitly not supported. Neither are most third-party controllers other than the PlayStation Move. Any Bluetooth headsets "that are currently commercially available" won't work. Bluetooth and USB keyboards will mostly work, but any special keys for the PS3 won't. And forget about mice.

Mind you, Sony says that game developers are free to write their own drivers to support some of these devices. But honestly, why would they?

One of the new features of the PS4 is that it can record up to 15 minutes of your game play for you to share with your friends. But if you don't like that idea, tough luck; you can't turn it off. The PS4 is always recording your game play, whether you plan to share it or not.

And if you do plan to share it, your choices are limited. Or rather, your choice is limited. You can choose to share your recorded game play on Facebook. YouTube? Nope. DailyMotion? Nope. In fact, the way Sony has it planned, there isn't even a way to get your gaming videos off the PS4 and onto another device.

Even the features that Sony has already announced for the PS4 won't necessarily be available when the console launches in November. Among the delayed capabilities are sharing the controller via the internet, suspend/resume mode, and support for wireless stereo headsets. Presumably, Sony plans to add these features with another big software update that you may or may not need internet access for in the future.

There's more, of course. The whole FAQ is pages long, and if there's anything you'd like to know about the PS4 before it ships, you'll probably find it there. But we just thought that, for a console that prides itself on giving you options, the list of things it actually can't do makes for interesting reading.

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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 9:20 am 
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That's a bit grim.

especially the faff for watching DVD's which fundamentally is what my PS3 is used for.


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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 9:46 pm 
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Mr Carrot wrote:
That's a bit grim.

especially the faff for watching DVD's which fundamentally is what my PS3 is used for.


You're not wrong. I'd be very disappointed if I were a Sony fan.

And after the amount of fuss Sony made about Microsoft's XBox restrictions and about how gamers would be better off with a Playstation etc. :doh: At least MS were more honest about their unacceptable restrictions.

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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 10:56 am 
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Xbox One Resolutiongate: the 720p fallout

How Call of Duty and Battlefield changed the console war.



Call of Duty: Ghosts. 1080p on PS4, 720p on Xbox One. Ouch.


By Richard Leadbetter - eurogamer.net


"The biggest thing in terms of the number of compute units, that's been something that's been very easy to focus on. It's like, hey, let's count up the number of CUs, count up the gigaflops and declare the winner based on that. My take on it is that when you buy a graphics card, do you go by the specs or do you actually run some benchmarks? Firstly though, we don't have any games out. You can't see the games. When you see the games you'll be saying, 'What is the performance difference between them?' The games are the benchmarks." - Microsoft technical fellow, Andrew Goossen.

We couldn't agree more. Despite the myriad gaffes and U-turns, Microsoft always had the right to make the case for its technology and to address its critics in the face of overwhelming criticism of its hardware design decisions. However, in the final analysis, the games are clearly the benchmarks that matter - and in terms of multi-platform offerings, relative system capabilities are a key battleground that Microsoft chose to mire itself in, with damaging results.

As the metrics emerge on key next-gen launch titles, it's clear that Xbox One is under-performing against its rival - not just according to the spec differential, but actually beyond the difference in raw numbers. Our Battlefield 4 Face-Off preview reveals a 50 per cent resolution boost on PlayStation 4 with no appreciable compromise in effects or performance in single-player gameplay, while Infinity Ward's Mark Rubin confirmed rumours that Call of Duty: Ghosts runs at native 720p on Xbox One, with 1080p a lock for PS4. Assuming uniform features and performance, that's a massive blow for Microsoft.

While Digital Foundry has yet to see either next-gen version of Call of Duty, our experience with Battlefield 4 demonstrates that you can easily see the visual difference between them. The Xbox One version holds up well given the gulf in resolution, but it doesn't require a pixel counter to tell that the PS4 game is crisper and cleaner either. At last week's Battlefield 4 review event in Stockholm, we noted that the resolution change from one version to the next was obvious to many of the press in attendance, with some even suggesting on-site that the PS4 version was operating at native 1080p when its actual resolution was 1600x900. Battlefield 4 is a beautiful game generally, but if it has one Achilles' heel common to both next-gen platforms, it is the pixel-crawl and sub-pixel break-up derived from the post-AA technique. Xbox One has bigger pixels and fewer of them, so naturally the most obtrusive element of the presentation is more of an issue when displayed on the same screen.

The reality for Microsoft is that the raw spec differential it has battled against is not only borne out in what is arguably the most technologically advanced multi-platform game of the next-gen launch, but the gulf actually increases on a title that, on the face of it, isn't pushing boundaries to anything like the same degree. Mark Rubin has previously suggested that there is no new Infinity Ward engine for the cross-generational Ghosts - rather that the studio has continued to build upon the existing tech. The situation is interesting in that we have a piece of technology that almost always favoured Microsoft's current-generation hardware now performing in a vastly superior manner on the competing platform in the next-gen era. It's a stunning turnaround.


A preview of the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions of Battlefield 4, as captured from near-finalised code. For the most accurate representation of what to expect in visual quality, make sure 1080p HD is selected. Note that the lower gamma range on Xbox One is an issue with system's current handling of full-range RGB.

Quote:
"As the metrics emerge on key next-gen launch titles, it's clear that Xbox One is under-performing against its rival - not just according to spec, but actually beyond the theoretical teraflop differential."



So what went wrong? The irony is that despite the battering it has received from both the Battlefield 4 and Call of Duty code, Microsoft is right in claiming that - in isolation - more compute power doesn't produce a corresponding level of performance, borne out by virtually any AMD GCN graphics card comparison you care to run in the PC space. In our In Theory piece on flops vs. frame-rate, we replicated XO and PS4 compute performance with PC parts, and saw the 50 per cent compute advantage whittled down to anything from 19 to 33 per cent, depending on the game.

Whether the performance boost is 19 per cent, 33 per cent or any number in between, that is still a tangible PlayStation 4 advantage, but not enough on its own to explain the BF4 and Ghosts differentials - the obvious conclusion being that raw compute power is just one part of the equation. Developers have faced a procession of issues with Xbox One GPU performance in the run-up to launch - some that are being tackled in the short term, others that will prove more difficult to address. Microsoft's "mono driver" for the AMD GPU had been known for months to be delivering sub-par performance prior to Gamescom in August (hence disappointing Ryse and Dead Rising 3 showings at E3) and while improvements have been - and apparently continue to be - delivered, developers have been working around a moving target, unsure exactly what the power of the graphics hardware will be in the final retail box.

Conversely, by that point, Ubisoft Reflections had already confirmed to us during its June presentation on porting The Crew to PS4 that GPU performance on the Sony platform was looking relatively solid, a state of affairs that presumably produced a stronger foundation for optimisation.

"The SDK (Software Development Kit) is changing all the time, [but] it's changing less quickly than it was six months ago," Ubisoft expert programmer Dr. Chris Jenner told us. "We're getting near to the final state, we're not expecting huge performance changes, just finalisation of features. It's a lot more stable than it was early on. We haven't had to do any changes for a while."

Quote:
The next-gen Kinect demos we've seen have been seriously impressive, especially in terms of dashboard integration. The problem is that seemingly little has been done to make the device more appealing and useful to core gamers, leading many to wonder why they should pay a premium for it.


Quote:
"Kinect functionality and other features take up ten per cent of Xbox One GPU resources that developers can't access right now, though plans are afoot to change this."



Driver revisions are clearly one issue, another is the remarkable ten per cent of GPU time reserved by the Xbox One operating system for functions like Kinect skeletal tracking, accounting for precious resources that are inaccessible to game developers. Again, Microsoft is looking to free up that GPU power, but that is clearly no help for developers in the launch period. While OS GPU time for PS4 remains an unknown, it has not been flagged as an issue thus far.

However, the hardware make-up itself could be more troublesome for multi-platform developers in the longer term, despite Microsoft's outline of how the Xbox One tech operates and the theoretical advantages it chose to highlight. In our In Theory piece, we could only address the teraflop difference - we couldn't measure the impact of Xbox One's reduction in memory bandwidth, and we certainly couldn't factor in what was then the big unknown: the controversial 32MB of Embedded Static RAM (ESRAM) built into the Xbox One's central processor.

In the Xbox One Architects interview, Microsoft positioned the Xbox One silicon as a natural successor to Xbox 360, with ESRAM defended as the most power-efficient, cost-effective solution for delivering 8GB of RAM in a console product - an evolution of the eDRAM that had served it so well in the current generation. We hear different stories about ESRAM from virtually every source we speak to, but two gripes are common. Firstly, the notion of operating between two memory pools for render targets is an additional pain that is not an issue on PlayStation 4's unified 8GB of GDDR5. Secondly - and perhaps most importantly - the most common compliant we hear is that developers really want more than 32MB for their high-bandwidth graphics work.

Talking to the Microsoft tech staff, we attempted to tackle the issue of the 32MB ESRAM limit by suggesting a 1080p render target scenario that wasn't that outrageous for a modern game engine, but would bust through the memory ceiling very easily. Microsoft countered by suggesting that those targets could be split between DDR3 and ESRAM, and pushed its own, more memory-efficient, compressed render target formats - similar to the ones utilised on Xbox 360 to great success.


Performance analysis of Battlefield 4 on Xbox One and PlayStation 4, where we see a fairly uniform frame-rate. But again, where the engine is under stress, it is PS4 that mostly comes out on top.

Quote:
"If studios like DICE and Infinity Ward - whose resources are vast - are having problems with Xbox One, the prognosis can't look good in the short term, though it stands more of a fighting chance with 30fps titles."



In the light of recent events, the question is, will those formats actually be utilised if they can't be easily supported on PC or PlayStation 4? More pertinently, faced with crushing deadlines for next-gen launch titles, isn't lowering the size of Xbox One render targets the much easier option?

So, will things continue to look grim for Xbox One multi-platform games in the launch period? On the one hand, if studios like DICE and Infinity Ward - where resources are vast - are having problems, the prognosis can't look good in the short term. What hasn't helped Microsoft's cause is that both of the key titles where we have known metrics are pushing 60 frames per second - the bleeding edge of performance on console, which rarely works out kindly where one platform has weaker GPU performance, as many of the current-gen Call of Duty titles demonstrate.

After six years of producing Face-Offs, it's safe to say that the 30fps cap we see on many multi-platform titles often acts as a great leveller in the pursuit of platform parity. We say that with some confidence as some 30fps titles can be unlocked, giving an idea of actual top-end performance on each platform. Running BioShock Infinite in unlocked mode, we see a frame-rate advantage for PlayStation 3 (helped in part by its lower resolution) over Xbox 360. Conversely, Batman: Arkham City also runs unlocked by engaging TriOviz 3D mode. There we see frame-rates soar far north of 30fps in many scenarios, but almost always with a clear Xbox 360 lead. All things being equal, a 30fps cap perhaps working in combination with a drop to 900p on Xbox One sounds like a viable approach, providing a level of platform parity closer to the situation we see on current-gen consoles. And indeed, there's much talk now from execs about games on Xbox One "looking great" without referencing image quality or native resolution directly.

Game developers have utilised varying resolutions over the current-gen period and we would venture to suggest that at a commercial level, it has had little impact on game sales. But the next-gen launch is clearly a very different situation - consoles are at their most expensive, gamers want the best deal, and if they have invested in a 1080p display, why wouldn't they want to get the most out of it? Speaking to Guerrilla Games' MD Hermen Hulst in Amsterdam last week, he believed that Killzone fans would not take too kindly to a non-native 1080p presentation. There are areas in Killzone Shadow Fall - particularly in terms of the game's state-of-the-art lighting and material detail, where the case for targeting full HD simply cannot be challenged from an image quality perspective - the results are simply stunning. At the other extreme, 720p is so closely associated with the current-gen standard by core gamers looking for that next-generational leap, that its association with Xbox One on major triple-A games does the console no favours.

Quote:
"While Microsoft is losing the multi-platform argument, the allure of Forza Motorsport 5 is difficult to ignore."



Direct feed gameplay of Forza Motorsport 5 on Xbox One - perhaps the best weapon that Microsoft has in its arsenal for championing what Xbox One is capable of.

But pixel counts aside, perhaps the most challenging issue Microsoft faces - and the same one faced by Sony across this generation - is of the more expensive console offering the sub-optimal experience in key titles. In the here and now, few game franchises are more important than Battlefield and Call of Duty. PlayStation 3's Blu-ray drive added significantly to the bill of materials back in 2006/2007, while the next-gen Xbox One comes with Kinect - an expensive addition that failed to gain traction with the core in the current generation. Looking forward to the next, Microsoft and third-party developers appear to be doing little to champion the capabilities of its successor, despite the sheer wealth of system resources dedicated to the technology.

Back in February of this year, in the era before Xbox One and PlayStation 4 were even announced, we knew these consoles only by their codenames - Durango and Orbis - and through their leaked specifications. Our assessment of the machine that was to become PlayStation 4 - even before its 8GB upgrade - was of a "tighter, more powerful, more games-focused design". In parallel, we summed up the precursor to Xbox One as a machine designed to be broader in nature, encompassing media and games - pretty much exactly how the console was presented at its reveal some months later, and a message that failed to resonate with many of the core audience. Yet some might argue that the thinking behind the approach had merit in speaking to a broader audience - Microsoft had seen Xbox 360 receive extensive utilisation as a media playback device, the role of console hardware had adapted across the generation, and Xbox One is, in many ways, a logical response to that.

Since then, Microsoft has reversed many of its setbacks and concentrated on gaming first and foremost - the "TVTVTV" focus in the messaging has all but gone and the platform-exclusive line-up is winning over gamers far more, we suspect, than its attempts to compete with PS4 on platform parity. However, in directly addressing the specs differential, whether in the Xbox One architects interview or in online forum posts, it has seemingly set itself up for another own goal. Microsoft itself has made the story about parity with the competition, when highlighting what makes Xbox One unique in terms of exclusive games, services and functionality - along with more effort in returning some of the magic to Kinect - may have served Xbox One more effectively in the run-up to launch.

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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:39 pm 
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Sony's new PlayStation 4: So AMAZING, except for just ONE little thing...

Players report early-gen glitches, Sony thrusts new firmware download


By Shaun Nichols - TheRegister.co.uk



Some of the thousands of early adopters who shelled out for Sony's PlayStation 4 console, launched today in the US, have already reported mysterious system failures.

The entertainment giant's support forums are littered with threads, some more than a dozen pages long, devoted to problems users are experiencing with their new powerful consoles.

Gamers have complained of hardware glitches that caused systems to reset and display a blinking blue light. Additionally players have reported issues with the console's physical HDMI connection. Suggested workarounds in the forums and elsewhere online have included fiddling with the HDMI port to remove any bits of metal obstructing the cable plug, and forcing a reformat of the PS4's hard drive by removing and reinserting the drive.

Sony had not responded to The RegAGR's request for comment on the failure reports.

For those customers lucky enough to have received a working console, Sony has release an early 325MB firmware update for the system. Version 1.50 of the software enables access to the online PlayStation Network, voice commands and Blu-ray playback.

Early hardware failures in consoles are nothing new as users who line up to be the first to own the systems are often also left to sort out first-generation design and manufacturing flaws.

When Microsoft released its Xbox 360 console, an infamous hardware condition branded the 'Red Ring of Death' sparked outcry and forced the company to extend warranties and cover repairs on broken systems.

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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:44 pm 
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So an update enables access to the online PlayStation Network, voice commands and Blu-ray playback? So much for not needing an internet connection to use it then lol.

And fancy any of those features not being included out of the box?! :ohmy: Looks like Sony didn't even finish the PS4's software before launch then. :rolleyes:

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 Post subject: Re: PlayStation 4
PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 5:03 pm 
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