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 Post subject: Re: LulzSec retire ask that the campaign continues
PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2011 1:33 pm 
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How LulzSec pwned The Sun

'Walnut-faced Murdoch' prompts pranktivist encore


By John Leyden • Register



Infamous pranktivist hackers LulzSec exploited basic security mistakes on a News International website to redirect users towards a fake story on the supposed death of media mogul Rupert Murdoch, it has emerged.

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The bogus story claimed that Murdoch had died after ingesting a "large quantity of palladium" (a rare metal*) before stumbling into his "famous topiary garden" (an in-joke reference to Topiary, the most famous member of LulzSec).

Later the same trick was used to redirect visitors of The Sun's website to LulzSec's Twitter feed.

Both hacks relied on exploiting security weaknesses on a site called new-times.co.uk/sun, which had been set up by News International while it was building a paywall for The Times. Hackers used an exploit, identified by The Guardian as likely to be a "local file inclusion" program, to exploit vulnerabilities in order to gain administrative control of this site. The site, although retired, was still linked to NI's Content Management System.

Hackers then used compromised access to the CMS behind The Sun's site to add their own redirection script to the "breaking news" element of the site. The rogue JavaScript was programmed to redirect surfers to locations under the control of hackers once the page reloaded. First it was pointed towards the spoofed story at new-times.co.uk/sun and later towards LulzSec's Twitter feed.

The level of compromised access may have allowed LulzSec access to NI's email database, but this remains unclear.

LulzSec famously disbanded last month after 50 days of mayhem that saw it attack numerous targets including FBI-affiliated security consultancies, UK police agency SOCA, numerous games publishers and Sony. In an update to its Twitter feed the group said it couldn't resist returning for one last gig. "Thank you for the love tonight. I know we quit, but we couldn't sit by with our wine watching this walnut-faced Murdoch clowning around."

The websites of The Sun and The Times were pulled down on Monday following the hack. Both have been restored. The server behind new-times.co.uk has been taken offline, probably permanently.

Meanwhile, the very-much-alive Rupert Murdoch is due to face a grilling from Parliament later today, when he will be expected to answer questions on the News of the World voicemail hacking scandal.


Bootnote

* Palladium is part of the platinum group metals and is used in dentistry, medicine, hydrogen purification, chemical applications and groundwater treatment. Reg reader Frederic Bloggs suggests it may have been mistaken by the hackers for polonium, the radioactive isotope of which was responsible for the death of ex-KGB turncoat Alexander Litvinenko.


*dances naked* :p

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 Post subject: Re: How LulzSec pwned The Sun
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 11:15 am 
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LulzSec say they'll release big Murdoch email archive

Rebekah Brooks apparently not a password genius


By John Leyden • Register


The hacktivists behind a hack on The Sun's website claim to have extracted an email archive which they plan to release later on Tuesday.

News International's systems were hacked on Monday night. As a result, visitors to The Sun's website were redirected towards a fake story on the supposed death of Rupert Murdoch by infamous hacktivist collective LulzSec. The group also redirected visitors to the main News International website to the LulzSec Twitter feed. In addition, the hack may have allowed LulzSec to gain access to News International's email database.

Sabu, a prominent member of LulzSec, said via Twitter that the group was sitting on emails of News International staffers that it planned to release on Tuesday.

In the meantime, Sabu released email login details for former News International chief exec Rebekah Brooks, a central figure in the News of the World voicemail-hacking scandal.

Brooks (then called Wade), edited The Sun between 2003 and 2009, and – at least according to LulzSec – had been using the password 63000 to access her email account at the paper. As IT blogger John Graham-Cumming points out, 63000 is the same number as the text tip-off line used by the Sun.

LulzSec also posted the supposed password hash – but not the password – of Bill Akass, former managing editor of the News of the World.

The hackers also posted the mobile phone numbers of three News International execs. This information seems to have come from, at best, an old database. The Telegraph reports that one of the phone numbers belongs to Pete Picton, a former online editor with The Sun who left to work on News Corp's iPad-only publication, The Daily, last year. Another phone number belongs to Chris Hampartsoumian, an IT worker. Hampartsoumian recently announced, via Twitter, that he does not work for any News Corp firm.

LulzSec certainly obtained deep enough access to News International systems during the Monday break-in to pull off a redirection hack on The Sun, but whether it obtained the depth of access it claims to have done remains unclear. A News International spokeswoman declined to comment when we asked if the organisation was taking the email hack claims seriously or whether it was taking any remedial action.

She said the firm was "aware" of the website redirection hack on The Sun, adding that all News International websites were now up and running as normal.

However The Guardian reports that News International took its webmail systems and remote access systems offline as a precaution following The Sun website redirection hack. Passwords were reset before remote access and other systems were restored on Tuesday morning, the paper adds.

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 Post subject: Re: How LulzSec pwned The Sun
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 11:16 am 
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That's one way to find out who's telling the truth. :D

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 Post subject: Re: LulzSec say they'll release big Murdoch email archive
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:54 pm 
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LulzSec says it will partner with media on Murdoch emails

Inspired by Assange™?


By John Leyden • Register



LulzSec has abandoned plans to release a cache of News International emails it claimed to have acquired during a redirection attack on The Sun website earlier this week. Instead the group says it plans to release select batches of the emails via a "partnership" with select media outlets, an approach akin to that applied by WikiLeaks to its controversial US diplomatic cable and war log releases last year.

The activist collective returned to action after disbanding last month in order to launch an attack on the Murdoch empire that resulted in surfers visiting The Sun being redirected towards a fake story on the supposed death of media mogul Rupert Murdoch. The group repeatedly said it had also extracted email archives during this hack, but uncharacteristically delayed their release. This distinguishes the hack from earlier Anonymous hacks on HBGary and ACS:Law, where email archives were uploaded by the hacktivists around the same time as the websites were defaced.

Sabu, a prominent affiliate of LulzSec, has repeatedly said the promised dump of emails from News International was imminent, most recently in a series of Twitter updates (here and here) on Thursday lunchtime, which claimed the group was sitting on an 4GB archive.

However, minutes later, Anonymous – the hacktivist organisation that re-absorded LulzSec after the latter group disbanded earlier this month – said it had abandoned plans to release these emails. "We think, actually we may not release emails from The Sun, simply because it may compromise the court case," it said.

LulzSec later said that it planned to release select extracts of the email batch via selected media outlets. "We're currently working with certain media outlets who have been granted exclusive access to some of the News of the World emails we have," it said.

The names of the "media outlets" concerned have yet to be revealed. Any mainstream media outlet that published the information may have some ethical qualms about dealing with the anarchic hacking collective, whose previous targets have most controversially included the Arizona Police Department and SOCA, the UK policing agency.

Neither LulzSec or Anonymous, whose stock in trade has been denial of service attacks and information extraction against numerous targeted organisations, has shown any respect for legal niceties or possible collateral damage from its releases before.

Thus far, LulzSec has only posted email hashes of a small number of NI workers, along with the supposed email password of Rebekah Brooks dating from the time she edited The Sun.

News International responded to the attack by suspending access to its webmail and remote access systems and applying a forced password reset.

In what initially appeared as an attempt to divert attention away from the topic of the NI international hack, Anonymous posted various low-value NATO documents.

The "NATO Restricted" documents posted may sound impressive but this is in fact the lowest possible level of protective marking/classification.

"We are sitting on about one Gigabyte of data from NATO now, most of which we cannot publish as it would be irresponsible," the group said.

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 Post subject: Re: LulzSec says it will partner with media on Murdoch emails
PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 9:30 am 
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Police arrest alleged LulzSec hacker 'topiary' in Scotland

Suspected of links to shear hackery


By John Leyden • Register



UK police have arrested a teenager suspected of being a central figure in the infamous LulzSec hacking crew.

The unnamed 19 year-old allegedly had been acting as a spokesman of both LulzSec and Anonymous, using the online handle Topiary. He was arrested at a residential address in the Shetland Islands earlier today and transported to central London for questioning.

The "pre-planned intelligence-led operation" is part of the Met Police Police Central e-Crime Unit's investigation into DDoS attacks against international businesses and police agencies.

A 17 year-old from Lincolnshire was also interviewed under caution by police as part of the same investigation. His home was searched but no arrest was made.

Scotland Yard's statement on the case can be found here.

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 Post subject: Re: Police arrest alleged LulzSec hacker 'topiary' in Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 2:00 pm 
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He should be sentenced to going out & getting a life

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 Post subject: Re: Police arrest alleged LulzSec hacker 'topiary' in Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 5:55 pm 
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Resurrection Joe wrote:
He should be sentenced to going out & getting a life


In the Shetlands?

Anyway... we don't even have confirmation it's really them yet, they've announced they've taken the 'leaders' out before and they were wrong. Whoever they arrest somebody else will take their place anyway, either online or in real life protests it's not something they can cut the head off however hard they try because there's too many anons from all walks of life. There's been a few arrests lately, mostly kids or teenagers from a wide range of places from Washington to Spain, Turkey to the Shetlands, the Netherlands and all over the US as arrests were made in Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Florida, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, and Ohio, with further raids and equipment seizures conducted in New York... but you just can't see that changing anything. EG In a story reported today, Anonymous called on people to close down PayPal accounts with a shout on Twitter - hours later 24,000 accounts and rising had been closed.

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Anonymous and LulzSec attack FBI and PayPal

In a joint statement from Anonymous and LulzSec released today, the hacktivist collectives lashed out at both the FBI and PayPal, saying that they are “terrorists” enacting injustices on America.

“In recent weeks, we've found ourselves outraged at the FBI's willingness to arrest and threaten those who are involved in ethical, modern cyber operations,” begins the statement. The message goes on to call law enforcement “ridiculous” for going after suspects believed to be linked to Anonymous and says that the denial of service attacks waged on websites to shut them down does not warrant 15 years behind bars of hefty fees. “What the FBI needs to learn is that there is a vast difference between adding one's voice to a chorus and digital sit-in with Low Orbit Ion Cannon, and controlling a large botnet of infected computers. And yet both of these are punishable with exactly the same fine and sentence,” they write.

The hacktivists add that they are outraged that PayPal continues to withhold funds belonging to WikiLeaks, and calls them out for assisting law enforcement in hunting down alleged donators.

“Quite simply, we, the people, are disgusted with these injustices. We will not sit down and let ourselves be trampled upon by any corporation or government. We are not scared of you, and that is something for you to be scared of. We are not the terrorists here: you are.”

Together, Anonymous and LulzSec urge their audience to close their PayPal accounts. “The first step to being truly free is not putting one's trust into a company that freezes accounts when it feels like, or when it is pressured by the U.S. government. PayPal's willingness to fold to legislation should be proof enough that they don't deserve the customers they get. They do not deserve your business, and they do not deserve your respect,” they write.

Within hours of calling on their followers to shut down their PayPal accounts, Anonymous relayed via Twitter that a source working for the online payment site has confirmed that over 24,000 accounts had been closed.

The hacktivists are asking people to tweet photographs of their closed accounts and spread the word. “Anonymous has become a powerful channel of information, and unlike the governments of the world, we are here to fight for you,” they write.

Last year, Anonymous waged DDos attacks on PayPal, Mastercard and Visa in response to the corporations’ stance against WikiLeaks. Earlier this month, a loophole allowed the whistleblower site to momentarily receive funds sent through Visa, bringing in upwards of six-figures for WikiLeaks.

This afternoon, The Associated Press reports that Scotland Yard's cybercrime unit arrested a 19-year-old UK boy believed to operate in LulzSec under the name "Topiary." In the past, Topiary took credit for being one of the six members making up LulzSec.

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 Post subject: Re: Police arrest alleged LulzSec hacker 'topiary' in Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2011 7:32 am 
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UK Cops 'duped' into arresting wrong LulzSec suspect

Will the real Topiary please stand up?


By Dan Goodin • Register



The 19-year-old Scotsman fingered Wednesday as a central figure of the LulzSec hacking crew is a fall guy who was framed to take the heat off the real culprit, according to unconfirmed claims from a rival group.

“We believe MET Police got the wrong guy and it happens because of lot of disinformation floating on the web,” a Thursday post on the LulzSec Exposed blog said. “LulzSec and Anonymous members are Master trolls and they are good at this.”

According to the post, penned by members of a group calling itself the Web Ninjas, the real LulzSec figure known as Topiary is a 23-year-old Swede, who stole the handle from a low-level member after he ran afoul of its parent group Anonymous. The mistaken identity was part of an elaborate ruse to confuse authorities about Topiary's true identity, the speculation claims.

The post comes a day after the Metropolitan Police said a "pre-planned intelligence-led operation" led them to a residential address in the Shetland Islands, off the North Coast of Scotland. That's where they apprehended an unnamed 19-year-old man and transported him to London for questioning. Police said they also questioned a 17-year-old from Lincolnshire and searched his home.

Thursday's post is devoid of any smoking guns, as is the case with almost all claims made in the shadowy world of anonymous people claiming to be elite hackers. For proof it points to this page purporting to contain information, pictures and videos of the real Topiary. The individual portrayed is almost certainly not that of the Scotsman arrested Wednesday.

Additional evidence comes by way of a chat log published near the bottom of this page purporting to show the real Topiary agonizing over the possibility that police are closing in on him.

“If I go hide then people will assume the dox are right,” he says, referring to the information posted on LulzSec Exposed. “So I'll just act like they failed hard.”

Several lines later, referring to the individual he stole his nick from, Topiary says: “I'm hoping someone will go after him and think it's me, then I'll act all scared etc. ANYTHING to divert attention from that fuckign nameshub.”

Of course, the chat log could have been fabricated by just about anyone, including people who want to generate doubt in the minds of Metropolitan Police investigators. With anonymous figures pursuing multiple levels of subterfuge, separating truth from fiction has become a full-time occupation for those trying to unravel this saga.

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 Post subject: The Anonymous Annals
PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 10:21 am 
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Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network

By Sean Gallagher | Arstechnica.com


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Pedophiles connecting to a concealed child pornography site got an unwelcome surprise last week, courtesy of the hacktivist group Anonymous. Lolita City, a child pornography site run on over a concealed “darknet,” has been taken down by Anonymous members, and account details of 1,589 users from the site’s database were posted as evidence.

The takedown is part of Anonymous’ Operation Darknet, an anti-child-pornography effort aimed at thwarting child pornographers operating on on the Tor network. Anonymous’ attack was focused on a hosting service called Freedom Hosting, which the group claims was the largest host of child pornography on Tor’s anonymized network. “By taking down Freedom Hosting, we are eliminating 40+ child pornography websites,” Anonymous claimed in its statement. “Among these is Lolita City, one of the largest child pornography websites to date, containing more than 100GB of child pornography.”

Based on a secure networking technology originally developed by the US Navy, Tor routes traffic through a collection of volunteer servers scattered across the Internet, making monitoring of what is being viewed or where communications are coming from difficult. The Tor network also hosts a private “dark” top-level domain, .onion (which is not an official TLD), via its Hidden Service Protocol; these sites are visible only to Tor users or those using a Tor gateway such as tor2web.org.

Because of its anonymity, Tor is widely used by individuals and groups seeking to communicate without being surveilled by authorities, employers, or eavesdroppers watching packets on public WiFi networks, as well as those wishing to visit websites anonymously without having their IP address recorded. According to the Tor Project’s own metrics, the service has recently been averaging over 400,000 users per day.

The Tor network was heavily used in Egypt earlier this year by dissidents to get around the Mubarak regime’s Internet shut-down, and is used by bloggers in Syria to communicate with the outside world. The network is also used by some who want to publish other sorts of material and conceal themselves from prying eyes, including pirated movie and software torrent publishers (which has made some Tor server providers the target of DMCA takedown notices). It's also attracted child pornographers and the pedophiles who are their customers.

However, as revealed last December, the anonymity offered by Tor isn’t foolproof. While the IP addresses of sites on the Tor network are concealed, they have a digital fingerprint that can be used to identify services hosted from a single location, and track visits to that site. And while it blocks some services that are typically used for denial of service attacks and other hacks within the Tor networks, such as UDP, .onion sites remain just as vulnerable to hacking as sites on the open Internet.

The Anonymous operation against Lolita City began on October 14, when members discovered links to child pornography on a .onion site called The Hidden Wiki. According to the group’s statement, Anonymous members removed the links, but they were reposted by a site administrator. Anonymous then moved to shut down the site with a denial of service attack. Additionally, the hackers matched the digital fingerprints of links on the site to Freedom Hosting.

After sending a message demanding that the hosting service remove the content, Anonymous’ hackers were able to exploit the PHP site with a SQL injection attack and extract the user database before launching a denial of service attack. “The server was using hardened PHP with escaping,” Anonymous said in its statement. “We were able to bypass it with with UTF-16 ASCII encoding.”

Photograph by Sharese Ann Frederick

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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 10:22 am 
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Now this is the sort of thing I can appreciate them doing. :thumbup:

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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 10:23 am 
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Nicely done. Old-school hackers (vs the modern money making criminals) are famous amongst geeks for doing this kind of porn takedown, it's not unusual at all and it's nice to see them get some publicity over it for a change imo.

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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 11:09 am 
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I wish they'd do something constructive like crack the new Football Manager game. :nur:

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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2011 7:16 pm 
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Reedo wrote:
I wish they'd do something constructive like crack the new Football Manager game. :nur:


Haha, not sure it's in their manifesto but give the cracking groups time and it shall be done. Cracks used to take a week or three before they all got so lame that they could be done in hours.

Apparently. Or so I've read. :angelnot:

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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2011 10:21 pm 
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Good move there - down with child pr0n.

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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
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I couldn't agree more MMFY... latest news is they've targeted a Mexican drug cartel.

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Anonymous confusion in clash with Mexican drug cartel

'It's WAR' - Anons far away. 'No it's not' - Mexicans


By John Leyden • Register



Plans by Anonymous to expose members and associates of a Mexican drug cartel have reportedly been abandoned, at least locally, amid doubts whether a member of the hacking collective was ever really kidnapped by the group.

In an ultimatum posted on YouTube on 6 October (and much later in English), Anonymous threatened to publish data on cartel members and affiliates in Veracruz unless an unnamed male kidnap victim was released by 5 November. The kidnapping supposedly happened during a street protest in the Mexican state of Veracruz or a leafleting campaign (reports vary). The hackers threatened to expose journalists, taxi drivers and corrupt cops that have collaborated with the cartel.

Los Zetas - a ruthless gang of drug traffickers known for kidnap, mass murder and hanging bloggers by their own intestines - reportedly responded to the ultimatum by hiring computer experts to track down individuals involved in the online anti-cartel campaign, dubbed #OpCartel.

Two self-identified OpCartel participants, Skill3r and Glyniss Paroubek, told Mexican newspaper Milenio on Sunday that the operation had been abandoned (following an internal debate) as "too risky" because it placed even those outside the hacker group in danger.

This might be just as well because security analysts warned that if Anonymous exposed details of the Zetas' operations this would almost certainly result in further bloodshed. Outing cartel members would act as a motive for reprisal attacks against bloggers. Meanwhile rival gangs might target those named on the list, regardless of its authenticity or accuracy.

"If Anonymous is able to increase the effectiveness of online operations seeking to expose cartel activities then that makes them and other anti-cartel bloggers in Mexico much higher profile targets than before," security analyst firm Stratfor warns.

"We have seen reports that Los Zetas are deploying their own teams of computer experts to track those individuals involved in the online anti-cartel campaign, which indicates that the criminal group is taking the campaign very seriously. Those individuals involved face the risk of abduction, injury and death — judging by how Los Zetas has dealt with threats in the past," it adds.

Anonymous members in the English-speaking world may still continue the campaign to release the details of Los Zetas collaborators, even without the involvement of their compadres in Mexico. Notorious Anonymous hacker Sabu, for example, tweeted: “# OpCartel is more alive than ever and as I told others in private, the war against corruption is on both sides of the spectrum. We are going to WAR!”

Conflicting statements from within the Anonymous camp have prompted the re-examination of #OpCartel more generally. Many have begun questioning whether an Anonymous member was ever kidnapped in Veracruz, the Guardian reports. For one thing issuing an ultimatum demanding the release of an unnamed person makes no sense. And why isn't there any mention of a date of the supposed kidnapping or police reports of a missing person associated with PaperStorm, the Anonymous-organised event in December and March, referenced in the YouTube videos?

Some have begun describing the kidnapping pretext - if not Operation Cartel itself - as a hoax.

Purported organisers of #OpCartel posted on the website called Anonymous IberoAmerica. "The Anonymous IberoAmerica site is now soliciting anonymous tips on cartel collaborators," the Guardian concludes. "That suggests that, if the promised revelations materialise, they could be nothing more than common rumours or gossip sent in by tipsters or foes of those named."

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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 10:01 pm 
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Hacking network Anonymous has released a recording of a conference call between the FBI and UK police in which they discuss efforts against hackers.

The call, said to have taken place last month, covers the tracking of Anonymous and similar groups, dates of planned arrests and details of evidence held.

Anonymous also published an email, apparently from the FBI, showing the email addresses of call participants.

The FBI and Scotland Yard confirmed the leak and said they were investigating.

It also emerged on Friday that hackers linked to Anonymous had accessed the websites of several US law enforcement agencies and that of the Greek justice ministry.
'Email intercept'

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While it now appears that the FBI-Scotland Yard conference call was obtained through an intercepted email recording, recent research does suggest it is possible for hackers to intercept communications systems once thought secure.

Earlier this week, two researchers from Germany's Ruhr University Bochum announced they had reverse engineered two of the secret ciphers used to encode calls made by satellite phones. The pair said the devices - used in military campaigns and natural disaster areas - used algorithms that were "considerably weaker" than what was available elsewhere.

Another noted security researcher, Karsten Nohl, told a conference he had generated a code book which allowed calls made on mobiles using the GSM standard to be decrypted.

One solution is to make VoIP (voice over internet protocol) calls using the latest encryption techniques. But such conversations only remain safe if any recordings are similarly encrypted and the decryption codes safely guarded.

The FBI said in a statement: "The information was intended for law enforcement officers only and was illegally obtained. A criminal investigation is under way to identify and hold accountable those responsible."

London's Metropolitan Police's central e-crime unit said the matter was being investigated but that no operational risks had been identified.

It was unclear how Anonymous had managed to obtain the recording but a lawyer for one of the suspects discussed told the BBC it appeared to have been taken as an audiofile from an intercepted email, rather than having been eavesdropped on.

A comment on one of the Twitter accounts linked to Anonymous, AnonymousIRC, said: "The FBI might be curious how we're able to continuously read their internal comms for some time now."

BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner says the recording, which was published on YouTube, will be highly embarrassing for the cyber crime detectives.

At one point an FBI agent thanks the Metropolitan police for their help with investigations, to which the British detective replies: "We're here to help. We've cocked things up in the past, we know that."

'Attention seeker'

According to the alleged leaked email, the 17-minute phone call took place on 17 January.

The email was sent to law enforcement officials in the US, UK, Sweden, Ireland and other countries, inviting them to "discuss the on-going investigations related to Anonymous, Lulzsec, Antisec, and other associated splinter groups".

The recording features the voices of about five men, apparently speaking from London, Los Angeles and Washington.

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What is Anonymous?

Anonymous describes itself as an "internet gathering". The term is used to describe a collective of people who come together online, commonly to stage a protest.

The groups vary in size and make-up depending on the cause. Members often identify themselves in web videos by wearing the Guy Fawkes masks popularised by the book and film V for Vendetta.

Its protests often take the form of disrupting websites and services.

Its use of the term Anonymous comes from a series of websites frequented by members, such as the anarchic image board 4Chan.

These allow users to post without having to register or provide a name. As a result, their comments are tagged "Anonymous".

In the past, groups have staged high-profile protests against plans by the Australian government to filter the internet and the Church of Scientology.

Many Anonymous protests tackle issues of free speech and preserving the openness of the net.

They begin with light-hearted conversation but move on to discussing the names of some of the people being tracked and their plans for legal action.

The online pseudonyms of suspects are included in the recording, but some of the real names appear to have been bleeped out.

Among those discussed are several British men accused of being behind cyber attacks in the US and UK, including Jake Davis and Ryan Cleary who were arrested last year.

The British detectives discuss delaying some arrests while US investigations are being carried out.

The police also refer to a 15-year-old who claims to have been behind an attack on online gaming site Steam last year, where the identities and credit card details of tens of thousands of users were accessed.

"He's a 15-year-old who's basically just doing this all for attention," says the British detective.

Anonymous is a loose collective of hackers, anarchists and pranksters which has targeted the websites of a range of governments, companies, law enforcement agencies and individuals in recent years.

Also on Friday, Anonymous claimed credit for an attack on a police website in the US city of Boston. A message posted on the site said it had been hacked several months ago in response to "police brutality" towards the Occcupy Wall Street movement.

This followed another attack on a police website in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, where officials say personal information on informants, crimes and residents were accessed.

Hackers operating under the Anonymous name also took over the website of Greece's justice ministry on Friday, prompting officials to take the site down.

The hackers said the action was a protest against Greece's signing of a global copyright treaty and the government's handling of the economic crisis.

The website was replaced with a video of a figure wearing the symbolic white mask of Anonymous supporters, saying: "Democracy was given birth in your country but you have killed it."




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 Post subject: Re: Anonymous takes down darknet child porn site on Tor network
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 11:19 pm 
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Well I can't help admitting that I did chuckle that various random people were listening in to FBI comms. about erm hacking groups like the random hackers that make up anonymous at any one time.

Interception or not, that's an oops for the FBI & Co.

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 Post subject: Re: The Anonymous Annals
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 11:20 pm 
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Changed the title as this has gone far beyond pr0n! How did i miss that drug cartel one lol? The FBI intercept is plain incompetent ont heir part!

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 Post subject: Re: The Anonymous Annals
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 6:17 pm 
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POLICE swooped on top members of computer hacking group LulzSec today, acting on evidence from the organisation's leader.

Two of the five suspects — who include two Brits, two Irishmen and an American — have been charged with conspiracy.

The other three are expected to face charges tomorrow.

Sources say the 28-year-old leader of LulzSec — known by the alias Sabu — has been secretly working for the US government for months.

An FBI official involved with the investigation said: "This is devastating to the organisation. We're chopping off the head of LulzSec."

The offshoot of the network of hackers known as Anonymous is believed to have caused billions of dollars in damage to governments and corporations.

Leader Sabu has been identified as Hector Xavier Monsegur, 28.

Working under the alias Sabu, the unemployed father-of-two allegedly commanded a loosely organised, international team of thousands of hackers from his flat in New York.

Unmasked

After the FBI unmasked Monsegur last June, he became a co-operating witness, sources said.

Monsegur pleaded guilty to hacking-related charges in August.

As a result of his co-operation, which was confirmed by numerous senior officials, the remaining top-ranking members of LulzSec were arrested or hit with additional charges this morning.

The five were identified by sources as Ryan Ackroyd, aka "Kayla", and Jake Davis, aka "Topiary", both of London; Darren Martyn, aka "pwnsauce" and Donncha O'Cearrbhail, aka "palladium", both of Ireland; and Jeremy Hammond, aka "Anarchaos", of Chicago.

Hammond was arrested on access device fraud and hacking charges and is believed to have been the main person behind the devastating December hack on US security company Stratfor.

Sources added that Hammond will be charged in a separate indictment, and they described him as a member of Anonymous.

The others are all suspected members of LulzSec, the group that has wreaked havoc on US government agencies including the CIA and FBI, numerous defence contractors, financial firms and corporations including FOX and Sony.

A spokeswoman for the Southern District and US Attorney Preet Bharara declined comment.

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 Post subject: Re: The Anonymous Annals
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 11:57 pm 
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