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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 1:34 pm 
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Apple slips Antennagate victims $15 each. The lawyers get $16m

But hey, don't forget the free iPhone 4 case, right?


By Jasper Hamill • The Register



Apple has sent out $15 cheques to fanbois whose iPhones suffered from dicky phone reception.

The Cupertino idiot-tax operation agreed to dish out the small payments after punters lodged a class-action lawsuit over the iPhone 4 "Antennagate" flaw.

When the smartmobe went on sale in 2010, its users complained about poor mobile network connectivity, prompting Apple's then-CEO Steve Jobs to issue a rare public apology. He admitted: “We are human and we make mistakes sometimes.”

The tech titan agreed to give out free rubber "bumper" cases to anyone upset by the dodgy signal quality, but that wasn't good enough for some users.

Apple did not reveal exactly how many American iPhone owners will get a cheque. It sent out the payment this week with this letter:

Quote:
Re: Apple iPhone 4 Settlement Class Action Distribution Payment

Dear:

Enclosed is a check in the amount of $15.00 representing your settlement award in the Apple iPhone 4 Settlement Class Action Settlement. The amount of your settlement award has been calculated pursuant to the terms of the Settlement that was approved by the court.

Pursuant to the terms of the Settlement, the enclosed check must be cashed by July 16, 2013; after that date, the check will be void and will not be reissued.

You should consult your tax advisor or accountant as to the tax treatment of the settlement award you are receiving under this Settlement because the Settlement Administrator and the attorneys representing parties in the case cannot provide you with tax advice.

Very truly yours,

Apple iPhone 4 Settlement Claims Administrator


Any iPhone 4 owner who cashes in the $15 cheque is still entitled to a free bumper, according to a website set up to publicise the class-action court action.

According to The New York Times, Apple has coughed up $53m to settle the case, but also handed out $16m to the plaintiffs' lawyers.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 1:15 pm 
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Apple: You thought Google dodged taxes? Get a load of THIS

'The market is going to be all over it...'


By Jasper Hamill • The Register



Apple has embarked on one of the biggest bond offerings in history as part of a ploy to avoid tax.

Cupertino will soon begin issuing bonds in what will be one of the biggest debt sales of all time, it announced today. The plan is part of a scheme to funnel cash back to investors over the next three years.

After its stock price fell to dismal lows of sub-$400 last week, Apple promised to return up to $100bn to shareholders by starting up a share-buyback programme and paying out increased dividends.

Reports have suggested the total size of the bond issue could soar up to $16bn, which has never been matched by any other non-bank bond sale in America.

The move is surprising because Cupertino has no debt and is currently riding high on cash reserves thought to be worth around $145bn.

However, as an estimated $100bn of these reserves is locked up overseas, Apple would have to pay 35 per cent tax to repatriate it. It is cheaper for Cupertino to borrow the cash from the markets and pay interest on it, than to repatriate its cash from overseas and pay the resultant swingeing taxes.

The bonds will be issued through Goldman Sachs as well as Deutsche Bank and demand is likely to be very high.

"The market is going to be all over it," said Todd Duvick, corporate credit analyst at Stifel Nicolaus. "It's a name that everyone follows and they're comfortable with. From a credit perspective it's going to be a good diversification name for a lot of accounts."

Bonds will mature in either 2016 and 2018 for the floating rate notes, or 2016, 2018, 2023 and 2043 for the fixed rate notes.

Read Apple’s announcement here.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2013 1:21 pm 
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Apple designer Sir Jony Ive holding up iOS 7 development: Report

Will knight of the round tablet pull it off by WWDC?


By Jasper Hamill • The Register



Visionary designer Sir Jonathan Ive’s perfectionism could be holding back the development of the latest version of the software used on iPads and iPhones, according to a recent report.

Famed as the head of Cupertino’s industrial design division, the knighted Essex lad was recently handed control of software design in a surprise move by CEO Tim Cook.

Apple software devs have been working flat out to produce iOS 7, which is expected to be a radically reworked version of the software which will do away with real-world-inspired, skeuomorphic* interfaces.

An insider has told Bloomberg that without the firm hand and big boots of Steve Jobs to beat him into line, Ive has pulled the team so far behind deadline that staff from the Mac and OSX teams have allegedly been drafted in to help him push iOS 7 out of the door.

The last time this happened was way back in 2007, before the release of the first version of iOS.

The report quoted mysterious “people familiar with the matter” as suggesting that internal deadlines had been pushed back to allow the iOS redevelopment, which is expected to be previewed at the WWDC in June ahead of a release in September.

Greg Sterling, an analyst with Opus Research, said: “Apple is really under tremendous pressure to come out with something different and something new. [Ive has] a tremendous sense of design, and he’s been the guru behind a lot of these enormously successful products, but he’s always had someone like a Jobs to push back on him and give him some guidance, and it’s not clear that Tim Cook is capable of playing that role. Maybe without a collaborator, he’s not as strong.”

Under Jobs, Ive worked as the head of product design, churning out game-changing products like the iPod, iMac and iPhone. Basically, the little ‘i’ in all these products might as well stand for Ive.

After CEO Tim Cook took over, he reconfigured Apple, leading to the October 2012 departure of software supremo Scott Forstall amid squabbles between senior management that appeared to be jamming up Apple’s creative process.

So as not to stall development any further, 46-year-old Ive was given responsibility for the look and feel of software as well as that of hardware, as part of Cook’s drive to encourage collaboration between departments.

He is now said to be making radical changes to iOS, which allegedly include getting rid of realistic graphical flourishes, such as the virtual bookshelf on Newsstand, and reworking email and calendar software.

Ive will be keen to avoid the drama of last year, with the catastrophic launch of Apple Maps. He’s also said to be keen to break down the compartmentalised approach of Steve Jobs, instead pushing for more integrated work between software and hardware divisions of the fruity firm.

However, according to insiders, this reshuffle pushed development of iOS 7 way back. New features are usually tested in February and Apple is reported to have slipped and fallen back from their usual schedule.

Work on the new software is top secret that it has been claimed programmers use a special film over the iPhones to stop observers catching a glimpse of the new iOS.

Benedict Evans, an analyst at Enders Analysis in London, said that urgent work was needed to revamp the email and calendar software, which have not changed greatly since iOS 1 in 2007.

He said: “There is a tidying up that needs to be done and a rethinking.”

Apple is understood to have met with boffins working on three-dimensional gesture technology, which allows people to operate devices by simply waving their hands.

This year is a critical time for Apple, which saw its share price plunge beneath $400 and was forced to announce a programme of share buyouts and dividend payouts to help keep grumpy shareholders happy.

It is also facing competition from rivals like Samsung, which is making products of ever-increasing quality, while Apple has failed to introduce a product with anywhere near the impact of its blockbusters of the past two decades.

Now all eyes are on WWDC - and Ive - to see if Apple can keep its place at the top of the tech tree.

* A design whose look-and-feel elements are cribbed from another real-world material. Examples include web pages which act (when you interact with them) like paper pages, hideous "wood" panels on station wagons and faux leather.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 8:35 pm 
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Apple asked me for my BANK statements, says outraged reader

Want a shiny iThing? Get your passport out


By Jasper Hamill • The Register



Exclusive Apple is believed to have asked some online shoppers to hand over copies of their driving licence, passport and bank statements to verify their identity.

A concerned Reg reader alerted us to Apple's data-slurp requests after she received one herself - and was told by her bank that they had never heard of private companies asking for this information.

After ordering an iPad for her young son, our reader - who works in the IT industry and does not want to incur the fruity firm's wrath by revealing her name - received a suspicious email purporting to be from Apple, but looking like the sort of dodgy call for information we're all told to strenuously avoid.

It read:

We perform security checks on our customers' credit card orders due to the fact that the cardholder is not present to sign for transactions. The Apple Online Store's Terms and Conditions state that Apple reserves the right to verify the identity of the genuine credit card holder by requesting appropriate documentation. Please note these checks are a security measure designed to protect your information.

The email continued:

Please scan a copy or take a photo of the following documentation in jpeg format and email it to eurofinance@euro.apple.com:

1. Card holders Drivers license or National Identity Card or Passport and 2. Recent Credit Card / Bank Statement showing card holder name, address and card number.


As our reader had scans of the documents to hand, she emailed over copies of them... and then immediately began panicking.

She phoned the police and her bank, who both told her the email was more than likely a fraud. She feared her identity was about to be stolen due to the amount of personal information she had just handed over.

But after Apple wrote back to her and told her they had checked the documents with a notary, she began to realise that it was a genuine, Cupertino-endorsed email. The letter said that Apple understood "her concerns" about sending over bank statements, but asked her to do it anyway, as well as ensuring her passport copy was in colour.

A quick scout through the Apple forum reveals [url=https://discussions.apple.com/message/16881680#16881680#16881680]similar complaints[/url] - and when we phoned the fruity firm's customer services branch posing as a fanboi, they confirmed that agents did indeed ask for copies of customers' driving licence, passport and bank statements.

The ability to do this is written into Apple's terms and conditions, as mentioned in the letter quoted above.

Our source said: "When I found out this was a genuine Apple request, I immediately cancelled the order. They've basically turned me into a future Android user.

"Apple told me they carry out spot checks for security reasons. But I don't think any private company should have the right to ask you to send over such personal documents by email.

"It's Apple's arrogant way of saying: 'Tell us everything about yourself or we won't sell you our products'. What's next? Will they ask for my inside leg measurement or a chest X-ray?

"I'm so angry. After sending that information, I thought I had been hacked and spent days worrying. The police told me I had definitely been phished, whilst my bank told me they had never heard of private companies asking for this information. Then I found it was genuine, because Apple had the cheek to ask for a colour scan of my passport. I'm shocked by what they've done."

El Reg recently wrote about a German court's decision to make Apple tighten up the way it uses customers' data. The ruling hinged around Apple's policy of "global consent" to its terms and conditions over how personal data is gathered and used.

Campaigner Nick Pickles, director of privacy and civil liberties campaign group Big Brother Watch, believes that Apple is seeking far too much information from consumers under the auspices of combating fraud.

He said:

It’s very concerning that a private company feels entitled to demand and store sensitive identity documents for [users] to purchase something from Apple.

This is a totally over-the-top approach to fraud and I would be astonished if there isn’t a better way of combating fraud than intruding on people’s privacy like this. Customers are apparently allowed to black out "sensitive details" on the copied documents, according to our source. Apple appears to offer no detail on how long the data will be held for, nor offer the customer an alternative way of verifying their identity. This heavy handed approach only undermines consumer confidence that companies respect their privacy and potentially increases the risk of identify fraud or people stealing identity documents to facilitate purchases.


Apple told El Reg it does not comment on individual cases. Apple's terms and conditions say: "We reserve the right to verify the identity of the credit card holder by requesting appropriate documentation."

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 9:56 pm 
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Why on earth would they have any legitimate use for those documents? The woman wanted an iPad for cash not credit. :blink:

Sounds pretty dodgy to me, whatever it is they're up to you can be it helps them more than we the customer.


It's just not on imo, these are your most prized forms of ID you can't be emailing them as an infinitely copyable .jpg file via insecure email because that's insane!


Apple astound me at times.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:55 am 
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It obviously helps their plans to take over the world, they can simply take those ID documents, change the photos, and issue them to the clone army that they're building in their under sea base.

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But James and Pak both said they were voting JSP


:doh:

You know what Paks like. He's probably voted JSP for woman of the year or something.


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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 3:03 pm 
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You do realise that email can easily be intercepted and you'd never know you'd just given some stranger colour copies of your passport, driving license, bank statements, etc? :blink: Hell, that's enough for anyone to steal your ID, open a bank account and get a mortgage and a car loan all in your name and you don't seem to mind you'd be left liable for the lot?!

If Apple are unsure, they can always contact the credit card provider/bank as normal and have them ring you to check that it's a legit transaction. They simply don't need your ID. I hope customers stand up for themselves and refuse to play ball. You can always buy your new shiny Apple kit from a shop instead where they don't bother you with all that.

Or maybe they'll just sell your info to any other companies that can pay? Is that any better? Or maybe they'll boost their own facial recognition database? Or someone else's, EG police, anybody who'll pay etc.

Nor is it paranoia, they obviously want them for some reason they're not telling us.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 3:29 pm 
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I sense that you don't share my belief in Apple's private clone army, nor their under sea base?

While perhaps a little on the sarcastic side (most unusual for me) the intent was to actually convey a belief in some nefarious means for the ID, rather than to seem to dismiss the concern.

It's a ludicrous thing for any company to ask of their customers.

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idontfeardeath wrote:
Spawny wrote:
But James and Pak both said they were voting JSP


:doh:

You know what Paks like. He's probably voted JSP for woman of the year or something.


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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 4:08 pm 
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Spawny wrote:
I sense that you don't share my belief in Apple's private clone army, nor their under sea base?

While perhaps a little on the sarcastic side (most unusual for me) the intent was to actually convey a belief in some nefarious means for the ID, rather than to seem to dismiss the concern.

It's a ludicrous thing for any company to ask of their customers.


The undersea base actually made me chuckle, reminded me of Homer's undersea house heh heh, but it did look like you were taking it a bit too lightly. My mistake. :p

They probably have a patent on the clone army. :ninja:

Even if they did have a need, which they most certainly do not, there are far better ways to get it to Apple than insecure email. Not a second thought for the security of their customer data, as always, and what happens when they get hacked again and they get uploaded on to the internet available for download?

Even if they were unhackable, you'd still only need a bog standard laptop, wifi card and some software and you can pick unencrypted emails out of the air for fun. It's a disaster waiting to happen if those contain people's full ID.

People have to remember, anything that's classed as unreasonable whether it's in the T&C or not is not considered legally binding.

I wonder how many people will send 'em anyway. :rolleyes:

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 4:16 pm 
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There's actually an episode of the Simpson's where "Mapple" have an undersea HQ where Lisa goes when she runs up a huge bill on her "MyPod".

I'm sure Apple have the patent to everything tucked away somewhere, no doubt they patented the automobile, fire, electricity, and gravity at some point.

Apple never care about their customers, this is just taking things to a more dangerous extreme as you're actually jeopardising the identity data of your customers to an unjustifiable degree.

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idontfeardeath wrote:
Spawny wrote:
But James and Pak both said they were voting JSP


:doh:

You know what Paks like. He's probably voted JSP for woman of the year or something.


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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 8:30 am 
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Apple likely guilty of e-book conspiracy, judge says days before trial

Evidence that Apple conspired to raise e-book prices is strong, judge says.


by Jon Brodkin - Arstechnica.com



The Department of Justice's claim that Apple led a conspiracy to raise e-book prices is on the verge of going to trial. It will be decided by a judge without the help of a jury — and that judge is already leaning toward ruling against Apple.

"I believe that the government will be able to show at trial direct evidence that Apple knowingly participated in and facilitated a conspiracy to raise prices of e-books, and that the circumstantial evidence in this case, including the terms of the agreements [between Apple and publishers], will confirm that," US District Judge Denise Cote said during a pretrial hearing yesterday, according to Reuters.

The US government accuses Apple of being the "ringmaster" in a conspiracy with e-book publishers to fix the standard prices of e-books at $12.99 and $14.99, above Amazon's typical rate of $9.99. Book publishers HarperCollins, Hachette, Simon & Schuster, Macmillan, and Penguin have already settled and promised to repay consumers a total of $164 million.

Apple denies being part of any conspiracy. Cote said her statement about the strength of the government's evidence is her "tentative view." Reuters called the judge's statement "an unusual move before a trial" which "could add to pressure on Apple to settle the lawsuit."

Apple lawyer Orin Snyder said in a statement, "We strongly disagree with the court's preliminary statements about the case today… We look forward to presenting our evidence in open court and proving that Apple did not conspire to fix prices."

The antitrust case, US v. Apple et al., will go to trial starting June 3 in US District Court for the Southern District of New York. It is expected to last three to four weeks and will be tried without a jury. Penguin had objected to the case being tried without a jury, but Cote denied Penguin's motion for a jury trial. Penguin has since agreed to pay $75 million to consumers to settle the antitrust claims in the case.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 11:08 am 
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Apple: iOS7 dayglo Barbie makeover is UNFINISHED - report

Plus: You don't like the icons? Blame marketing


By Andrew Orlowski - The Register


Well, this would never have happened under Steve Jobs. Apple sources have briefed a friendly tech blog that the much-mocked iOS7 makeover is still provisional. When was the last time Apple felt obliged to defend anything?

The Barbie-flavoured icons revealed at Apple's WWDC on Monday are merely a "mid-stride snapshot", according to Next Web blogger Matthew Panzarino.

After talking to Apple, Panzarino mused: "Of the various aspects of iOS 7, the design of its icons and other visual cues are the most in flux at the moment. There are still refinements and conversations going on around them. I don’t know but would expect there to be a lot of fixes for the inconsistency we’re seeing in things like gradients and design language on the home screen."

He means gradients and design language that looks like this:


Image
Designers poke fun at the new iOS 7 "palette". Credit: Johnny Waterman

There's also an extraordinary claim in the article.

"Many of the new icons were primarily designed by members of Apple’s marketing and communications department, not the app design teams."

Which, if correct, is akin to Apple saying: "We gave the job to amateurs", rather contradicting its own marketing material, which spouts (endlessly) how DESIGNED the whole exercise is.

Apple has made design mistakes before, tweaking logos several times before they end up in a shipping product. For example, for over a year, the Public Preview of Mac OS X sported the Apple logo in the centre of the menu bar - which would be overwritten by applications menus.

Of course, the version of Mac OS X from the year 2000 had precisely zero users to confuse at the time: it was the very first release. The current iOS installed base is over 300 million. And that was in the days before social media, which can whip up a Twitterstorm over almost anything trivial.

Much more typically, Apple rides out ridicule by ignoring it - not by blaming the marketeers.

What on earth is going on?

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 11:13 am 
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China Labor Watch gumshoes uncover TOP SECRET PLASTIC IPHONE

How long did you wor- OHMYHEAVENS new iPhone!


By Jasper Hamill - The Register



The first concrete details of Apple's cheapo plastic iPhone have been inadvertently revealed during a recent labour rights' group probe into alleged worker abuse on Cupertino's Chinese production line.

China Labor Watch produced a long document describing the alleged long working weeks of workers at three Pegatron facilities and claiming that over 80 labour rights violations were taking place at the factories, including underage labour, insufficient wages and poor working conditions.

Although the report described a culture of gruelling overtime, cramped living conditions and rock bottom pay, it also gave fanbois and gurlz a tantalising glimpse of the new phone being built.

The new phone is apparently in the prototype stage, but seems to include a plastic shell, making it cheaper than Apple's previous high-end offerings.

The report quoted an unnamed worker, who discussed building a naff-sounding plastic iPhone.

He said:

Quote:
Today's work is to paste protective film on the iPhone's plastic back cover to prevent it from being scratched on assembly lines. This iPhone model with a plastic cover will soon be released on the market by Apple.

The task is pretty easy, and I was able to work independently after a five-minute instruction from a veteran employee. It took around a minute to paste protective film on one rear cover. The new cellphone has not yet been put into mass production, so quantity is not as important.


It may sound like the name of a horse-shaped Transformer, but Pegatron is a Taiwanese firm that operates factories in China. It was a subsidiary of Asus, the world's fifth-largest computer company, which spun it off in 2007.

China Labor Watch sent investigators into three Pegatron Group factories between March and July 2013, and they carried out interviews with more than 200 workers.

The three factories were Pegatron Shanghai, where the iPhone is being produced, Riteng, which is also in Shanghai and produces Mac computers, and a factory called AVY in Suzhou which produces iPad parts. The three factories employ some 70,000 staff.

The investigators alleged they had uncovered at least 86 "labour rights violations", including 36 legal violations and 50 ethical violations.

The Apple supplier has said it plans to "investigate the matter and [will] take immediate action to correct any violations of Chinese labour laws and its own code of conduct".

Apple responded to the allegations in a lengthy statement. It said it had carried out 15 audits at Pegatron's facilities since 2007, looking at the working conditions of more than 130,000 staff. These inspections included surprise visits and spot checks, said the fruity firm.

Apple said: "Apple is committed to providing safe and fair working conditions throughout our supply chain. We lead the industry with far-reaching and specialized audits, the most transparent reporting and educational programs that enrich the lives of workers who make our products."

The company added: "Additionally, we have closely tracked working hours at all of these facilities. Our most recent survey in June found that Pegatron employees making Apple products worked 46 hours per week on average. Excessive overtime is not in anyone’s best interest, and we work closely with our suppliers to prevent it."

Rumours suggest that the iPad-maker will release the cheaper iPhone later this year, with September mentioned as a possibility.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 11:21 am 
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Apple is at it again... legal and ethical violations against it's (sub-contracted) workforce.

If it's like most 'surprise inspections' then they'll be announced before hand, giving the company time to clean/fix/move anything that shouldn't be seen so it's no surprise at all. Clearly these 'checks' are not working despite Apple's press releases to the contrary.

Would it be too much to ask to expect decent people to be ethical and not to buy anything from people who commit these kinds of crimes? *sigh* :wall:

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
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Apple iOS 7 makes some users quite literally SICK. As in puking, not upset

'Eye candy really is as bad as classical candy is for the teeth,' writes one


By Rik Myslewski - The Register


Forging new frontiers in fanboi fragility, some members of the iDevice community have taken to Apple's discussion forum to complain that iOS 7 makes them want to puke.

No, their nausea isn't being caused by mere aesthetic revulsion. Rather, the source is iOS 7's many zoom animations along with the slight parallax effect that iOS 7 uses to create the illusion of 3D display layers – home-screen backgrounds, for example, can be seen to shift slightly behind icons as a user rotates their phone.

These bits of UI trickery make some people sick.

"The zoom animations everywhere on the new iOS 7 are literally making me nauseous and giving me a headache. It's exactly how I used to get car sick if I tried to read in the car," wrote the initial poster in an Apple forum entitled "Any way to turn off iOS 7 navigation animations?"

"I have the same problem," writes another. "After using it for two minutes, I felt nauseous."

A third: "I have the same problem. It hurts my eyes and makes me dizzy. So annoying that we can't downgrade!!!! Really unhappy with Apple on this one :-("

A fourth: "I thought I was going crazy today after I updated my phone and I noticed I was feeling queasy every time I used it. Now I see I am not alone! I just used my phone for about 20 minutes and now I feel like I'm going to vomit."

Image
Settings > General > Accessibility > Reduce Motion > toggle switch; there, parallax problem solved – but zooming animations? No solution available


There are many more complainers in the forum, which has 146 postings as of early Thursday afternoon Pacific Time, with words such as "nausea", "headache", "motion sickness", "dizzyness", "eye strain", "vomit", "vertigo", "blurred vision", and "seizure" peppering the comment thread.

While it may be tempting to regard these reports as the whining of fragile snowflakes, there is likely a solid physical basis for their symptoms. As one academically minded poster writes:

Of course this is a real issue, and I'm not at all surprised it exists, given how psychedelic things look even in some of Apple's press photos. Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) and visual stress (http://www.lucid-research.com/visualstress.htm) have become very active fields of research because of the implications in applications ranging from (FPS) video games to jet and airline pilot training through alleviating reading problems in dyslexics and enjoying contemporary art. And it happens to be one of my fields of research.

Another poster reports, "My research suggests that it is a very real problem attributed to Neuro-Ocular Vestibular Dysfunction, or what's been coined: See-Sick Syndrome," while a third advises, "If you have Ménière's or labyrinthitis DON'T upgrade," referring to two disorders of the inner ear that can cause vertigo in conjunction with certain visual stimulus.

It's unlikely that iOS 7's puke-inducing user interface is merely caused by so many users merely "holding it wrong."

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 1:57 pm 
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What a load of nonsense. Having seen the new update it is f**king disgusting, though.

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 4:33 pm 
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Serbinator wrote:
What a load of nonsense. Having seen the new update it is f**king disgusting, though.


Nonsense why? Seems legit with 100s of genuine complaints, and that's not even counting the thousands (if not millions) who just dislike the new colour scheme and other eye candy like those eye-busting animations, there appears to be real medical issues.

Serves Apple right in a way for giving the reigns to the new iOS design to their case designer. :doh:

And it's not half as funny as that fake Apple advert that's been doing the rounds. Apparently it started on 4Chan, and promised Apple iPad/iPhone users that the OS update would make their device water proof.

And according to the posts I've seen, many Apple owners tested this new functionality.... Oops. :snigger:

Quote:
Fake 'waterproof iPhone' ad tricks users into destroying their smartphones

Hoax claimed that iOS 7 update included a "smart switch" that automatically protected iPhones' "delicate circuitry" when they came in contact with water




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A fake advert claiming that Apple users can make their iPhones waterproof by upgrading the device’s software has reportedly tricked users into breaking their phones.

The misleading rumour has circulated on social networks accompanied by a mocked-up advert that closely resembles Apple’s official marketing.

“Update to iOS 7 and become waterproof” claims the ad (see below) explaining that “In an emergency, a smart-switch will shut off the phone’s power supply and corresponding components to prevent any damage to your iPhone’s delicate circuitry.”

Users who believed the advert reportedly upgraded their iPhones and dunked the devices to test the feature, only to find that they had broken the expensive gadgets.

Some have taken to Twitter to vent their displeasure at being tricked. One user wrote "Ok whoever said IOS7 is waterproof GO F*** YOURSELF".

The iOS 7 update was released by Apple last week and introduces many new features and a visual overhaul, but does not make iPhones waterproof.

Apple announced yesterday that more than 200 million users had upgraded to iOS 7, and that the new iPhone 5s and 5c had sold a record-breaking 9 million units during the launch weekend.

The spoof advert reportedly originated on the notorious online forum 4chan, which regularly undertakes campaigns that hijack social media in order to trick the public.

One hoax from 2012 involved members of the forum hacking the official Twitter account of 'Entertainment Tonight' and broadcasting a message that popstar Justin Bieber has been diagnosed with cancer.

The message encouraged fans to shave their heads in support, with the the hashtag #BaldforBieber used to spread the hoax.

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The fake advert in full.


:lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
PostPosted: Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:33 am 
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Haha this is brilliant :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Apple, the iPhone and various other disasters
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Don't crack that Mac: Almost NOTHING in new Retina MacBook Pros can be replaced

Proprietary screws and gobs o' glue


By Neil McAllister, The Register



Teardown Apple's new MacBook Pro laptops with Retina displays pack more punch than ever before – Cupertino described last year's 15-incher as the "best computer Apple has ever made," and this year's Haswellified model improves on it.

But when it comes to taking them apart and fixing them, the new designs are more locked down than ever.
Apple's MacBook Pro with Retina display models from 2013


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Apple's MacBook Pro with Retina display models from late 2013: Keep your hands on the outside

The hardware dissectors at iFixit.com found Apple's latest 15-inch MacBook Pro "took a turn for the (slightly) worse" where reparability is concerned – which is saying something – while the new 13-inch model dropped a full level down in iFixit's Reparability Score, such that both editions now rate a dismal 1 out of 10.

Not only are the new laptops' batteries fixed in place with buckets of very strong glue, but key components are now soldered to the main logic board, making them difficult to replace but also more likely to break.

For example, the headphone jack is now soldered to the motherboard. That connection could easily come undone through normal wear and tear, but as iFixit observes, "break yours ... and you're looking at a thousand dollar repair."

More significantly, the new MacBook Pros have followed the tradition of the 2012 models by soldering the RAM to the logic board. However much memory you order yours with, that's how much you'll be stuck with for the life of the machine. No upgrades are possible.

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Photo of the 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina display logic board: The 13-incher's logic board, showing Intel Core i5-4258U CPU (red) and soldered-on RAM (orange)

Apple has once again used proprietary flash drives in its latest models, too, meaning you won't be able to swap out your storage for off-the-shelf parts, either. Significantly, however, this time around Cupertino has traded out the earlier mSATA drives for PCIe-based parts.

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Apple's new, custom PCIe-based SSDs, as found in the latest MacBook Pros (front and back)

If those off-limits components aren't enough to deter you from cracking open your MacBook Pro, Apple has sealed up the case and key internal components using its notorious, proprietary pentalobe screws.

But perhaps the most vexing thing about the new MacBook Pros is that Cupertino has once again chosen to fix the battery in place using not screws but glue, a practice that began with the MacBook Air and now seems de rigueur for all of Apple's laptops.

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It's possible to pry the battery from a late-2013 MacBook Pro, but difficult, and the results aren't pretty

This time around, iFixit's repair gurus spent half an hour trying to pry the 15-inch MacBook Pro's battery away from the case and weren't pleased with the results. Complicating the process was the fact that the battery now covers the trackpad cable, meaning not only is the trackpad difficult to replace, but any attempt to remove the battery is likely to shear the cable in half.

"So much for the evolution of design," iFixit observes.

Similarly, the Retina displays in the new MacBook Pros are completely sealed. If the display ever fails, you'll need to replace the entire unit, which is sure to be an expensive repair.

You can check out detailed teardowns of the 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display models at iFixit's site, complete with scads of high-resolution photos.


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The 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display, in all its disassembled glory – but it was a hard-won battle

As the tool-and-repair pros point out, however, if you don't like the direction Apple is heading with how its laptops are manufactured, you may be out of luck. Cupertino has already stopped selling the 15-inch MacBook Pro with a non-Retina display, and iFixit is betting it will discontinue the 13-inch non-Retina model next year.

Given how difficult it is to actually repair or replace anything inside the Retina models, teardowns like these of Apple products may soon be little more than visual curiosities, having no practical value.

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