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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 5:47 pm 
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Get Hughes in, if he'd take it.

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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 5:49 pm 
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Never. Would rather a German as our manager than a Welsh!

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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 5:57 pm 
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borocooper wrote:
3 poor performances I'd say. At fault for the Russia goal, the Bale goal and the second Iceland goal


I dunno about the Russia goal can't remember the exact people but it wasn't a great clearence, we didn't close down the cross very well & the person marking the goal scorer from the original set piece totally lost him which allowed him to pull to the back post and get a miss match on Rose who could do nothing to stop him. Hart was where you'd expect him to be in terms of position but the Russian CB executed the perfect header. The bigger concern in the Russia game was that moment where he ran to the corner and almost got tackled think that was after the goal his head had just completly gone.

Serb ~ I think Hughes would do a good job plus he's got international experience but he's Welsh so would he take it?

The England job is a poisioned challice if Hughes takes it and fails which he will because everyone does then he can kiss his chance of another PL job goodbye and he probably feels he's got time left but along with Allardyce I think they'd do a good job they'd organise the team and hopefully cut out the silly errors that cost us goals in big tournaments it wouldn't be pretty but it should get results.

Outside bet would be David Moyes I wouldn't be surprised if he's put his name forward to the FA he's the sort of man they'd go for and he's got plenty of experience in English football (not all positive) plus he needs a route back in the only problem is there's going foreign and then there's going Scottish.


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 8:42 pm 
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If we are going Scottish Sir Alex. It's a part time gig!

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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 9:49 pm 
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It's a shame Bruce has ruled himself out.

I think I would go Pardew, but he isn't even being mentioned


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 10:13 pm 
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Pardew hasn't done enough for me plus his behaviour on the touch line rules him out he's mellowed a bit but he's a loose cannon.

We'll probably end with Mr Nice Guy Roberto Martinez


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 7:59 pm 
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England’s Euro 2016 campaign was undermined by a deterioration in the working relationship between Roy Hodgson and Gary Neville and a series of disagreements among the coaching staff, the Observer can reveal.

While the England players bonded well during the tournament, it has emerged there was friction behind the scenes when it came to Hodgson and members of his backroom staff.

Although the relevant people all have considerable respect for one another, in the worst moments there was a clear divide about the team’s methods and, in particular, signs of tension between Hodgson and Neville.

England showed they never learn, never improve and never bounce back | Paul Wilson
Others became involved, with Hodgson’s methods openly being questioned by his own staff. “The players got on fine,” this newspaper has been told. “It was the coaches who fell out.”

The Football Association was so concerned about high jinks at the team’s base in Chantilly it has also emerged the £500-a-night Auberge du Jeu de Paume was told to remove its chandeliers before the players arrived or risk them being smashed. The hotel reopened this weekend and staff have revealed they took down their most expensive glass fittings because the FA was worried they might be damaged.

While the players were generally supportive of Hodgson and angered by reports that they questioned Raheem Sterling’s selection in the Iceland game, the fact they took it upon themselves to remove Harry Kane from corner-taking duties indicates they were not always happy with the manager’s tactics.

Hodgson’s training methods – questioned by Steven Gerrard after the last World Cup – were one source of the disagreements. Neville had a close ally in Dave Watson, the goalkeeping coach. Players have complained of mixed messages and the general sense of confusion is not eased by the revelation that one turned to the dugout during the Iceland defeat and asked where a team-mate was supposed to be playing.

The revelations come on the same day the FA’s chief executive, Martin Glenn, described his predecessors as “naive” for paying so much to previous England managers and made it clear the next appointment would be offered a performance-related salary.

Hodgson’s annual £3.5m pay meant he had the highest basic salary of all the managers at Euro 2016, though still considerably less than the £6m-a-year packages that were put in place for Fabio Capello and Sven-Goran Eriksson.

“Roy’s got a fortune but it’s half the fortune that Fabio got,” Glenn said. “The argument against Sven and Fabio in the past was that it wasn’t benchmarked. We were just naive. I think we will pay a benchmark salary for the right person. To start off, it has to be results-orientated.

“My view on these things is: take the emotion out of it, what are benchmark earnings for top-quality football management? To get a really good person, if they are currently earning £4m in a club you have to be in that zone.”

Glenn, describing himself as “distressed” by England’s failings, added: “Luckily, we’ve got the FA finances [right] now. It’s been ugly but we’ve restructured, we’ve reorganised, we’re in a better financial position than we’ve ever been, which doesn’t mean I want to be lax with the money.

“I know a little bit about what Joachim Löw gets. There are other things in there that we don’t have in ours. Certainly in the case of Germany there’s a percentage of the sponsorship figure that goes direct to the manager. So when you look at the total package it’s little bit different.

“We need to be in the zone of what the world champions are paying and, competitively, how to make it attractive to someone. We are going into the market and you’ve got to pay a market attractive rate, but no one wants to be naive.”

England will begin the new era with a friendly at Wembley on 1 September, pencilled in against the Czech Republic, followed three days later by a game in Slovakia for the team’s first World Cup qualifier. If an appointment has not been made before then it is still possible Gareth Southgate, the Under-21s manager, will be asked to fill in purely for those two games.

Southgate is reluctant to be appointed as interim manager and, privately, the FA has admitted that decision has caught them on the hop. Glenn and his colleagues expected Southgate to jump at the chance.

Arsène Wenger has given the FA little encouragement and that leaves an extensive list of candidates that features Laurent Blanc, Roberto Martínez, Slaven Bilic and Jürgen Klinsmann, with Glenn Hoddle, Sam Allardyce, Steve Bruce and Eddie Howe leading the list of English options.

Glenn reiterated that he would prefer an English manager “but if you look at it there aren’t that many at the top level”.

To that effect, the FA is not restricting its search, especially when it has already been reported that senior players actively want a foreign appointment, believing the English candidates to be underwhelming. Wayne Rooney, Joe Hart and James Milner will all be consulted but the FA is already aware of feelings in the dressing room.

Glenn confirmed Steve Peters, the psychiatrist who formed part of Hodgson’s entourage in France, was unlikely to be involved in the new regime on the basis the FA wanted dedicated full-time people to help get into the players’ minds.

“Steve has been great and fair play to Roy because it was a bit of leap in the dark,” Glenn said. “I think there is an open question now of: ‘Could we use people like Steve or others in a more structured way, in the way we do with the development teams?’ That is an open question and I would want the next England manager to be open to that type of idea.”


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 1:54 pm 
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When I was a small kid I thought cars had an on and off lever. The lever had to be set to ‘on’ for the car to work and any car that didn’t work had merely had its lever pulled onto ‘off’ by mistake. In fact, I thought this was the case with everything electrical or mechanical. In my simple little brain it made perfect sense. When our electric cooker stopped working, I crawled around the back to try and find the on/off lever. Even though my mother told me time and again there was no such thing, I couldn’t be persuaded. And the whole ‘levers’ thing has rather stuck with me as an idea, to the extent that even today, when I happen to sell a lot more books than usual, I’ll say ‘the orders lever has been pulled to on’. That’s how it feels.

It works for football too. When your side suddenly starts scoring a lot of goals – that’s because the goals lever has been pulled to ‘on’. Obviously, the lever doesn’t exist, but still we search for it, especially after England have been eliminated from a tournament and the manager has resigned.

By far the worst thing about England getting knocked out in ignominious fashion isn’t the actual football, it’s the endless post-mortem, hand-wringing and anger.

Time after time it’s the same word cloud. Leaders. Coaches. Fitness. Tiredness. Tactics. Mentality. FA. Strategy. Rooney. Passion. Money. On and on it goes as a million voices search in vain for a definitive answer to England’s problems, search for some truth or definition. Always looking for the lever marked currently set to ‘off’ to pull it to the ‘on’ position.

The trouble is, as you’ll already know if you’ve ever listened to the various debates, there is a riposte to every so-called truth about England’s failures. The garbage spouted this week about us lacking leaders is typical. It is blind to the fact that plenty of teams have leaders and lose. Italy just did. It’s blind to the fact that all the past leaders such as Butcher, Adams, Shearer or whomever you want to say, all played in poor, failing England sides. The evidence that a lack of leaders isn’t the problem is all around. But then, you can contradict any argument in football. There are always sides who have won against the odds, who didn’t have this or that advantage. There is no pattern to achieving success. No route to follow to make it happen. No logic, no planning, nothing.

The one explanation for England’s failure never, ever offered is this: there is no reason.

It just is what it is. Football is not just a game of fine margins, it is a game of complete chaos. That is, anything can happen at any time and it can change a win to a draw, a draw to a loss in a microsecond. One flick of a foot, one deflection, a split-second reaction, cocking your foot to 46 degrees rather than 51 can all make a profound difference. You can have a great manager and lose, you can have an average manager and win. A worse team of players can beat a better team of players in any 90-minute period. We see it again and again. That’s the nature of knock-out football. Iceland and Wales have just proved it, if it needed proving again. Portugal have got to a semi-final without even winning a game in 90 minutes and by not playing very well. What does that prove? Nothing, except that football really is chaos and those who seek to tame it with systems, routines and forward planning are going against the very nature of the sport.

Those who seek ‘answers’ and want a plan or a route which can be plotted to success will always be disappointed. There are no answers, only reasons why, after the fact. Hindsight analysis doesn’t help with predicting or planning the future when it comes to football. There are myriad variables and almost no certainties. But this frightens a lot of people. Maybe it even frightens the players. The very nature of the game means you can go from hero to zero, zero to hero in split seconds.

Football is not a computer game. It is not programmed. There isn’t any right thing to do, or wrong thing to do, outside of the basics. When ex-FA Chairman David Bernstein was interviewed this weekend, it was clear that he hadn’t a clue how to make England into winners and why should he? Anyone with an answer is always proven wrong in the fullness of time. Tournament football undermines everything and everyone. It isn’t a simple meritocracy where the best one wins. He listed all the usual things from the state of the FA to the grassroots and coaching. But how did any of that explain being beaten by a country with none of the advantages we have in England? It didn’t and it can’t. No-one can suggest a definitive solution because there are none. So we might as well stop worrying about it and start enjoying the random nature of the whole thing.

Sure, get more coaches, make things less competitive for children, stop buying newspapers that tell lies and promote negativity. Stop worshipping players. Stop hating players. But do all of these things because they’re worth doing, not because it will make England successful. Football will never surrender to this sort of scrutiny. It is always one deflection off a passing pigeon away from contradiction.

I know everyone always wants answers and, even more in the divided, fetid, febrile atmosphere that is currently the norm in England, wants someone to blame. It’s all a waste of time. It’s everyone’s fault, it’s no-one’s fault and that’s just the nature of the beast. All you can hope is someone accidentally kicks the lever set on ‘Lose’ to ‘Win’. Until then, embrace the chaos.

John Nicholson


I think these comments are pretty fair but one thing that would definetly help England be more successful is not having the play like a big team.

England with the quality of players they have should be setting up like an underdog to play on the counter attack but because we're England we are almost forced to be the team on the front foot in most of the games we play.

I also think we shoot ourselves in the foot sometimes by looking to make radical changes just before the tournament case and point being Clyne/Milner playing almost every minute of qualification then hardly playing at the tournament. Rooney being our main striker for the qualifying then being redeployed as a midfielder at the tournament.

We need a manager who is going to be strong enough to stick to his plan even if it upsets the journalists we need a guy who says this is the way I want to do it and if it works brilliant if it doesn't then thats fine someone else can take over.


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 1:32 pm 
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Sir Alex Ferguson believes England should appoint Sunderland boss Sam Allardyce as their next manager, if the Football Association opts for an English candidate.

Ferguson feels Allardyce's experience of managing in the Premier League makes him the stand-out candidate, should the successor to Roy Hodgson be a homegrown coach.

The former Manchester United manager feels the appointment will be a difficult one for the FA, especially in light of the national side's failure at Euro 2016.

Ferguson says the new boss has to have an understanding of what it takes to manage England, and that Allardyce is a logical option when only three English managers are currently employed in the top flight.

"The problem is there was an expectation England would do well and because they didn't, it's all a bit flat," he said. "So they need to work out what the plan B is.

"It's very difficult to think of the right man and there are only three English managers in the Premier League. With Sam (Allardyce)'s experience, he is the obvious choice.

"But I think they have to search wider to make sure they get the right one. If it's Sam, fine. But they have to have someone with the capabilities, the tactical awareness and the feel for the national side.

"Thank goodness I'm not making the choice because it's a difficult one but Sam's the best English candidate because he's in the Premier League."

Ferguson also feels England will always be at a disadvantage to other nations because there is no winter break in the Premier League and because there is very little down time between the end of the domestic campaign and the build to an international tournament.

"The league programme English players go through - to then play a major tournament after that makes it impossible," he said.

"In Germany they have a rest in December and January and teams who play in a better climate must be better prepared than English players.

"They don't even get a month's rest because they played three friendly games and they're training from June 12. That needs to be addressed."


Interesting point about the warm up games Wales only had 1 warm up match which I think they lost but it didn't really matter as they knew the plan from qualifying and have stuck to it.

England f*cked around with different formations and different players in their games and it probably gave the manager new head aches.

I actually agree with Ferguson that Allardyce probably deserves to be given a chance the only problem is his playing style is almost the complete opposite of that the FA have tried to build but the same was probably true of Hodgson.

I just feel that Allardyce might have the balls to stand up to the media and pick the team he wants to pick not the one they're telling him to pick.


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 1:49 pm 
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Couldn't agree more


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 12:02 pm 
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Former Manchester City manager and current Inter Milan boss Roberto Mancini, 51, is interested in taking charge of England. (Guardian)

Ex-England captain Gary Lineker and former Manchester United defender Rio Ferdinand have been consulted by the Football Association as to who should be the next England manager. (Times - subscription required)

Former Tottenham and West Ham boss Harry Redknapp, 69, has been ruled out as a potential successor to Roy Hodgson with England. (Daily Express)


If they've asked Lineker & Ferdinand then it's definetly going to be Hoddle :shrug:


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 Post subject: Re: Roy Hodgson Engwand manager
PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2016 4:39 pm 
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The Germany general manager, Oliver Bierhoff, has suggested his compatriot Jürgen Klinsmann is in discussions with the Football Association over the vacant England head coach role and would be a good choice.

Klinsmann, who last month steered the United States to a best-ever fourth-place finish at the Copa América, would fulfil the criteria stipulated by the FA. He is a World Cup and European Championship winner who has experienced the Premier League as a player with Tottenham Hotspur, speaks excellent English and has enjoyed a fruitful career in international management with USA and Germany.

Perhaps most significantly he played his part in reforming the Germany national team set-up a little over a decade ago, bringing in Bierhoff as general manager in 2004 and helping to kickstart a revolution based on discarding the old guard and the promotion of youth. Germany have since featured in the semi-finals at six consecutive major tournaments, winning the 2014 World Cup.

“It’s not like putting a hand on the shoulder and everything happens,” said Bierhoff, a close friend of Klinsmann, when asked about the FA’s intention to appoint a strong figure to revive England’s fortunes after another miserable tournament. “A lot of things need to come together. When we failed at Euro 2000 we invested a lot in the infrastructure and the education of young players and coaches, so now we have a lot of talented players and the Bundesliga is investing in young players.

“Perhaps it is an advantage that good players go to England and other countries, so our clubs have to bring other players through. But since the arrival of Jürgen Klinsmann – who I think is in discussions with England – we have also given the national team a certain pride, atmosphere and organisation. The success of the story is the high quality but also the good organisation and good atmosphere we have in the group.”

Asked whether Klinsmann could thrive with England, Bierhoff said: “He would be a good fit. We started in 2004 together and he’s not always, how can I say, nice to handle because he wants to change [things]. But he brings motivation. He has the courage to make difficult decisions and, perhaps, you need something like this.”

Klinsmann, who steered Germany to the semi-finals of the 2006 World Cup, has overseen the USA since 2011 after a brief spell with Bayern Munich and is contracted until the 2018 World Cup in Russia. The 51-year-old’s time in charge has had its difficulties and relations with the president of the US Soccer Federation, Sunil Gulati, have been strained of late, not least over the governing body’s apparent reluctance to appoint a Bierhoff-like figure as general manager.

Klinsmann suggested on Friday in an interview with CNN that, although he remains excited at building a legacy in the US, the football structure in the country remains fragile and disconnected and referenced England as an example of a system built to flourish. “It’s a bigger puzzle in the United States than in other countries and it’s not perfect yet,” he said. “We don’t have a system in place like France or Germany or even South American countries.

“If you look at the FA in England, it’s more than 100 years old and they already have their infrastructure, scouting, coaches’ education, national training centre, and the pyramid is connected. There’s relatively little infrastructure work to do in England. Here in the United States building that infrastructure is still important.”

The FA, which has preferred not to comment on the identity of specific candidates, has not set a timescale for the search for a manager and is likely to appoint an interim to oversee fixtures in September, which include the first World Cup qualifier in Slovakia.


Think he'd be a good choice strong minded guy who won't be bullied by press


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