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 Post subject: Re: Brazilian Football
PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2014 8:16 pm 
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Brazil are set to name their new national team coach, with reports suggesting Dunga is likely to return to the post.

Brazil will announce a coach on Tuesday to succeed Luiz Felipe Scolari, who resigned after Brazil failed to win the World Cup having suffered a humiliating 7-1 defeat by Germany in the semi-finals.

Reports say Dunga will get the job, although the Brazilian football confederation has declined to confirm the appointment.

Dunga was the captain of Brazil’s 1994 World Cup-winning team and coached the national team in the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. He departed after Brazil lost 2-1 in the quarter-finals to Holland.

The return of Dunga seems to be linked to the naming of Gilmar Rinaldi as the new technical director, replacing Carlos Alberto Parreira.

Rinaldi was a goalkeeper on the 1994 team and Rio de Janeiro daily O Globo said he and Dunga had reached a quick agreement for the former coach and captain to return.

The second choice for coach seems to be Tite – Adenor Leonardo Bacchi – the coach of the Brazilian club side Corinthians. He was an early favourite but slipped after Rinaldi was named.

Dunga was in charge of 60 matches as national team coach. Brazil won 42, drew 12 and lost six.


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 Post subject: Re: Brazilian Football
PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2014 11:00 pm 
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Brazil’s pathetic and cringe-inducing surrender at the World Cup – first against Germany and then again against Holland – showed the locals that it was time to return to the drawing board. Amid the debris there seemed to be a consensus that wholesale changes were necessary.

The 7-1 defeat against Germany was such a shocking result that there were even suggestions that the Brazilian football confederation would appoint a overseas manager for the first time in the team’s 100-year history. Whatever happened, everyone agreed that there was time for a fresh approach.

So what does the CBF do? It only goes back to the past to reappoint Dunga. It beggars belief. The 54th managerial change since the Seleção job was created in the 1920s will not only mark the 12th time a coach returns to the seat, it will also mark the resurrection of one of the most controversial figures to have occupied the post. The 1994 World Cup-winning captain has been charged with giving Brazil some purpose again. For the record, yes, that is the same Dunga who left the job in disgrace four years ago.

Where can one start? A good first step is the fact that the former Seleçao hero has hardly covered himself in glory since leaving the job – by the way the first managerial position he occupied. Only after a two-year sabbatical did Dunga have another go, taking charge of the southern Brazilian side SC Internacional, the club where he made his breakthrough as a player in the early 80s. The experience lasted less than a year and until recently Dunga’s main comeback chance had been a financially tempting offer to lead Venezuela in a vain bid to end their status as the only South American side never to have played in a World Cup finals.

It is probably fair to add that Dunga’s first stint as Brazil manager was not an abject failure by any normal standards. With 42 wins and 12 draws in 60 games, the man nicknamed after the Brazilian version of Dopey, the least noble but much-loved of the Seven Dwarfs, oversaw the 2007 Copa América and the 2009 Confederations Cup titles, alongside Brazil’s first topping of the South American qualifiers in their league format. Victories included drubbings of Argentina and Italy. Even the Seleçao’s 2-1 defeat by Holland in South Africa in 2010 did not look that bad after they put on a first-half display that could and should have ended that quarter-final at Port Elizabeth.

His team did not play beautiful football, but that had hardly been a problem until the moment the manager seemed to have no response to his team’s poor defending against the Dutch. The main issue is that a few years before that July afternoon in South Africa, Dopey had turned into Grumpy.

Just as in 1994 he used the privilege of lifting the World Cup trophy as an opportunity to address in expletive terms how he felt about media criticism – four years before, he had been unfairly singled out for Brazil’s tepid display in Italy – Dunga the manager also adopted a siege mentality that trickled down to his players and made his side one of the less loved in recent history, a feeling that even the presence of players with a far different, more light-hearted image such as Kaká and Robinho were not able to alleviate the atmosphere surrounding the group. It did not help that Dunga showed a very dismissive attitude towards Neymar, who in 2009 was already the hottest young prospect in a Brazilian football. The manager chose instead not even to include the youngster in the 23-man squad in South Africa.

Dunga’s particular feud with Globo TV, the most powerful player in the Brazilian media landscape and for years a privileged partner of CBF, became a public war of attrition that had inevitable consequences to how he and his players behaved. Even evangelical golden boy Kaká managed to get sent off in a World Cup marred by the red card received by Felipe Melo, a midfielder moulded as a carbon copy of Dunga’s midfield enforcing style on the pitch.

So this is the man Brazilian football authorities think is the best name to lead Brazil into a journey in which they need to slay dragons with banged armours and broken swords. But after CBF announced last week that Gilmar Rinaldi, the former Selecão goalkeeper and players’ agent, was to take over the technical director role, few could be shocked to discover that Brazil were not really promoting a big change in course after their gruelling domestic World Cup heartbreak. Burned as he was after being so badly caught out by counterparts such as Joachim Löw and Louis van Gaal, the departing manager Luiz Felipe Scolari at least had a CV that included the 2002 World Cup.

“Created” in 2006 as a Brazilian version of the German experiment with Jürgen Klinsmann in that year’s World Cup, Dunga proved to be a budget version limited to national pride and a respectable image, lacking above all Klinsmann’s ability to learn from mistakes and to leave a legacy to his country. He now has a second chance that even the former captain himself must have felt was never coming back his way.

He had better make the most of it. Or risk having a direct participation in a decision-making process in Brazilian football which can only be described as shocking.


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 Post subject: Re: Brazilian Football
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 10:17 pm 
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Arsenal supporters are unlikely to have fond memories of André Santos. The Brazilian’s two-year spell at the club, between 2011 and 2013 included 13 Premier League starts, one attempted high-speed getaway on the M25 and one ill-advised half-time shirt swap with Robin van Persie. All in all, not a great return for the £6m Arsène Wenger paid to secure the defender’s services from Fenerbahce.

Since leaving Arsenal, however, life has got worse for Santos. A lot worse. Now plying his trade back in Brazil, the left-back was last week at the centre of a series of events that will surely cause the harshest of his critics to side with him. Upon leaving the Estádio Beira-Rio in Porto Alegre on 20 July, he was beaten up by a group of Flamengo fans furious that their team, which he had represented for almost exactly a year, had just been trounced 4-0 by hosts Internacional – a result that left the Rio side entrenched at the bottom of the Campeonato Brasileiro.

“I am absolutely saddened and shaken by what happened. It [the aggression] was the work of a minority of supporters but as a professional footballer and a father I never expected to experience a situation like that. I didn’t see the supporters coming and when they started hitting me the only thing I could think of was to try to protect my head,” said Santos.

That was far from the end of Santos’ misfortune. Only two days after the incident outside Beira Rio, one of the arenas used in the 2014 World Cup, Flamengo released the 31 year-old, a decision announced by the player in an interview with a daytime TV Globo programme that can only be described as a bad Brazilian version of Loose Women. The fact that the club’s directors quickly denied the contract termination in public while briefing the journalists off the record that they wanted to send the player packing only makes the story sadder.

From being hailed as a possible successor to Roberto Carlos in the Seleção and actually replacing the former Real Madrid star at Fenerbahce in 2009, Santos now finds himself surplus to requirements even at a club in Flamengo’s grim position. Santos was given the first of his 24 caps for Brazil in 2009 by Dunga, during the new Brazil coach’s first spell in charge, but his international hopes were all but killed in 2011 after he missed one of the four penalties in a Copa América shootout defeat to Paraguay and followed that with a poor display in a friendly against Germany that somehow did not end with the cricket scoreline that Thomas Müller and company imposed in Belo Horizonte.

Santos is hardly a veteran, but it would be an immense surprise if his career did not simply fade away – even if he has surprised a few people before. After failing to establish himself at the Emirates despite an interesting first season, he shot himself in the foot with a metaphorical bazooka with that ill-judged decision to swap shirts with Van Persie during the Dutchman’s bitter reunion with Arsenal just months after his move to Old Trafford.

His intended gesture of sportsmanship was followed, three months later, by a loan move to Grêmio. But Santos actually threatened to rekindle his career in Brazil: after spending only five months with Grêmio he moved to Flamengo and helped the club to a heroic Brazilian Cup title last year. But then things turned sour: after only 28 games and a poor run for Flamengo this season, he became an object of hatred for the club’s fans.

Poor form or not, nothing can justify the despicable behaviour towards the full-back in Porto Alegre. Santos’ plight exposes a problem that Brazilian authorities underestimated in the buildup to the World Cup. The brand new arenas were built according to standards applicable to situations where crowd control is pristine. Last year, a fight between Corinthians and Vasco supporters at the Mané Garrincha in Brasília highlighted the challenges faced by the domestic game at times when crowd violence still erupts.

Santos was not attacked inside the Beira-Rio itself – after eschewing a lift to the airport on the team bus, he was about to enter a private car that was waiting by the stadium’s media entrance. The fact that he was left so exposed raises serious questions that are independent from the fact that his career has never returned to the heights seen when he featured heavily in Brazil’s 2009 Confederations Cup-winning campaign and was considered a certainty for the 2010 World Cup squad.

Even if it could be argued that Santos has lacked the maturity, rather than merely the quality, to persevere in European football and fulfil what was expected of him in Brazil, the more pressing concern surely lies in how Brazil’s football authorities can protect the areas around the country’s stadia and curb supporter incursions that, in this instance, crossed a line in the most dangerous fashion.


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 Post subject: Re: Brazilian Football
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:02 pm 
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It was not 7-1. It was not an epic humiliation. It was not a result that will reverberate through the generations. But in a sense, Brazil’s Copa América exit to Paraguay is all the more crushing for that. It was not some devastation to be written off as a freak; it was quotidian. Brazil went out of the Copa América by losing a mundane game 4-3 on penalties after a 1-1 draw because these days they are a mundane team; they no longer generate the emotional extremes they once did.

Four years ago, Brazil also went out of the Copa América in a shootout against Paraguay, but this was worse, far worse. At least then there was talk of a new generation coming through, a sense that the likes of Neymar and Ganso were not quite ready but that they might be soon. If this tournament proved anything it is that Brazil are utterly dependent on Neymar and that he is uncomfortable – as anyone would be – with the pressure.

It’s been a long time since the notion of jogo bonito was anything other than an empty marketing slogan. The beauty has left the Brazilian game. The obsession with running and physicality that first developed – belatedly – as a response to a first-round exit in the 1966 World Cup has become dogma. The dictatorship that took power in Brazil in 1964 imposed technocrats in all walks of life: it was an article of faith that everything could be measured and analysed. That is why a military PT instructor, captain Cláudio Coutinho, worked with the team at the 1974 World Cup and was the coach in 1978. The 80s and Telê Santana brought a brief reflowering of the old way, a reignition of the myth, but since then the drift into pragmatism has been relentless.

There are no Gersons, Falcãos or Toninho Cerezos any more, just runners and battlers. Those who might once have sauntered in front of the defence, languidly setting the rhythm, are dispatched to the flanks to become laterals. Battle and grit and yards covered are the watchwords now. That, of course, is Brazil’s right: they are not obliged to live up to a marketeer’s romanticising of the past, and they won two World Cups by combining a solid core with a handful of fantasistas.

“They don’t produce anything any more,” Arsène Wenger said in an interview with the Wall Street Journal even before the humiliation of Belo Horizonte. “Even in midfield, they’re good – but they’re not the great Brazilians of the past.” And those they do produce tend to be whisked away as soon as their talent emerges: 12 of this squad have not played 50 league games in Brazil, only enhancing the sense of disconnection.

What has emerged more recently, what has soured any notion of the beautiful game is boorishness. It may be that hosting the World Cup, and the expectation that brought to bear, magnified the issue, but the slide from pragmatism into expediency has long roots. The reappointment of Dunga, the step back into a past that seems increasingly prehistoric, was essentially a rejection of the need for change, a retreat into the conservatism that had created the problems in the first place. The familiar may seem comfortable, but it also smacks of a complacency, an unwillingness to believe that the rest of the world may have moved on without it.

There was a Brazil youth team around the turn of the millennium who would wait in the dressing room until the last possible moment, leaving the opposition waiting in the tunnel, and then charge out screaming and spit on their rivals in a usually successful attempt to unsettle them. This was in a youth tournament, the purpose of which is supposed to be player development. Such was the lust for victory that abhorrent behaviour was at the very least condoned, perhaps even suggested, by coaches.

“The pressure to win will always exist in Brazil,” Dunga said before the Copa América. “The national team must remain competitive and winning at any cost.” At any cost – that was the unpleasant edge to the hysteria that surrounded, and ultimately overwhelmed, Brazil last year, most obviously manifested in the tactical fouling.

Some of the sense of entitlement, perhaps, has gone, but Neymar’s petulance was surely born of a combination of the demands on him to drag this team to the heights its public expects and his frustration that opponents had the effrontery to try to stop him. The tactical fouling has continued into this tournament. Before the quarter-final, Brazil had committed the fifth most fouls per game, which does not sound too bad until you consider they have had the third most possession. Fouls are usually a consequence of not having the ball; the two sides that have had more possession than Brazil, Chile and Argentina, have committed the fewest and second-fewest fouls per game.

Late on against Venezuela, Brazil had four centre-backs on the pitch, Dani Alves playing on the right wing and Elias as the advanced central midfielder. At one point, Elias received the ball in space in the centre-circle, turned, and – with no one ahead of him – launched a ball into the corner to run down the clock. It is cynical and almost wilfully ugly football.

It is not even winning football any more. It took a brilliant pass from Neymar in injury time to beat Peru. They lost to Colombia. They wobbled horribly when 2-0 up against Venezuela. Then, here, having gone ahead after Robinho converted an Alves cross – the two thirtysomethings were probably Brazil’s best players – they contrived to let a very ordinary Paraguay side back into the game. Robinho’s finish was their only touch in Paraguay’s penalty area in the first half.

What was most striking was the lack of fear about Paraguay, even while they were just humping balls into the Brazil box. No longer protected by the carapace of their reputation, what remains of Brazil is weak and unsightly. By the end, the largely Chilean crowd was hooting its derision. It’s a sound that should live with Brazil, the overture of their collapse. The beauty has gone, the aura has gone, and with them the respect of the continent has gone.


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 Post subject: Re: Brazilian Football
PostPosted: Fri Aug 14, 2015 5:58 pm 
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The Orlando City midfielder Kaká was the surprise inclusion in Brazil’s squad for the September friendlies against Costa Rica and the United States.

The 33-year-old former Milan and Real Madrid player was included after being left out of the squads for the 2015 Copa América and the 2014 World Cup.

The Paris Saint-Germain forward Lucas and Zenit’s Hulk were also recalled, while the young Santos midfielder Luca Lima was selected for the first time.

Brazil play Costa Rica in New Jersey on 5 September and then head to Foxborough to face the United States three days later.


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 Post subject: Re: Brazilian Football
PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2015 7:28 pm 
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The Brazil midfielder Fred has been banned for one year for doping, according to the governing body of South American football.

The 22-year-old tested positive for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide during the Copa América in Chile. He has continued playing for Shakhtar Donetsk, including 10 Champions League matches, while awaiting the verdict.

The South American confederation backdated the ban to 26 June and has applied it only to the matches it sanctions.

If Fifa extends the ban worldwide, it would rule Fred out of league play for only four months. The Ukrainian league’s winter break means Shakhtar’s next match is on 18 February in the Europa League.


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 Post subject: Re: Brazilian Football
PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2016 12:31 pm 
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The Manchester City target Gabriel Jesus is on the verge of completing a transfer out of Palmeiras but has not confirmed his destination.

The 19-year-old forward, currently with Brazil’s Olympic squad, has also been linked with Manchester United, Real Madrid, Barcelona and Juventus.

While his focus now is on his country’s home Games, he promised his destination will be known “before long”.

“My future is almost decided,” he said at a Brazil press conference.

“My family, my representatives and Palmeiras know where I want to go but now I’m totally focused on winning gold for my country. The agreement is almost done but I’m completely concentrated here.

“Before I came here I was in negotiations but now that I’m here I’m leaving it to my parents and my agents. Before long my decision will be known.”

Jesus has scored 19 goals in 31 games for Palmeiras this year.


Seems everyone has a hard on for this kid never heard of him sure he's got a banging YouTube highlights reel though


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