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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 1:47 pm 
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Mourinho has always used him well... he always get his fair amount of protection from referee ..

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So true mate ...he is consistently inconsistent throughout his united career ..but what if he turns consistent ..he will get around 40 goals...ATM im waiting for that time as his age is 24/25 :wait: ... :|
on Rooney ,Jan 16th, ..and as they rest is history


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2016 8:10 pm 
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He's announced his contract at Chelsea isn't being renewed for next season

My guess is MLS


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2016 11:22 pm 
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John Terry has confirmed he is to leave Chelsea at the end of the season when his latest one-year contract expires at Stamford Bridge, drawing a line under a trophy-laden 18-year professional career at the Premier League champions.

The former England captain was informed the club would not be offering him a third 12-month extension at a meeting before last weekend’s win at Arsenal. The 35-year-old, capped 78 times, has claimed four Premier League titles, five FA Cups and three League Cups with the club, and has also won the Champions League and Europa League. While he intends to prolong his playing career beyond this campaign he will do so outside the Premier League. Lucrative offers for his services are likely to come from China, the Gulf or even the United States.

The one small caveat offered to Terry was the vague possibility the situation might change when a permanent successor is appointed to José Mourinho in the summer, though the centre-half has already resigned himself to this being the end of an era. “It’s not going to be a fairytale ending, I’m not going to retire at Chelsea,” he said after leading his team to a 5-1 FA Cup fourth-round win at MK Dons on Sunday. “I was in last week before the Arsenal game and it’s not going to be extended.

“They said that, when the new manager comes in, things might change but it’s a ‘no’ at the minute. I needed to know now, like I have done every January and sometimes it takes a couple of months to get done. Unfortunately it was a ‘no’. I’m going to be playing out my career elsewhere, which it took me a couple of days to get over. But, like I say, I knew before the Arsenal game and my performance isn’t going to change: the way I train, what I give for the club. I want to give everything and finish on a high, on 100% good terms with the club.”

Terry will follow Petr Cech, Frank Lampard and Didier Drogba in leaving the club over recent years, together with Mourinho who was sacked for a second time in December, to signal that Chelsea are now clearly moving away from the most successful team in their history. The youth-team product, who moved to the club at 14 and made his debut in October 1998, has held initial talks over a potential future role back at Stamford Bridge, though that would be considered only once his playing career is over.

“We spoke about my legacy and coming back to the club when I finish but the most important thing now is to get us up the league,” he said. “It’s my last run in the FA Cup so I want to make it a good one. It’s a big season for me and I want to push on – not just in this competition but in the Premier League as well. I knew before the Arsenal game so mentally I’ve kind of accepted it. We just have to move on and climb the table.”

The player sought to announce his departure post-match at Stadium MK with neither Guus Hiddink nor the club hierarchy having offered any comment in their media conference. He was apparently not offered any specific reasons behind the club’s decision. “No, we didn’t get into it,” he said. “I didn’t feel as though I was playing great in the first four or five games of the season, like everyone in the team, and the performances showed that. But since then myself and everyone else has picked up back to where we are. All I can do is keep my head down and plug on because it’ll be my last year at the club.

“The club will move on. No player is ever bigger than the club. Ideally I would have loved to stay but the club’s moving in a different direction. No doubt they’ll sign one or two great centre-backs. I want to come back as a Chelsea supporter in years to come with my kids and see the team doing really well. Unfortunately that’s not going to be with me but I want to see the team do well. It’s going to be my last year and I want to go out at the top.”

Asked about the prospect of moving to another English club, Terry said: “No. I couldn’t do that to the Chelsea fans. I couldn’t play for another Premier League club. It will be elsewhere for sure. I don’t know where, and I leave that to the people in charge, but it certainly won’t be in the Premier League.

“My agent made the call like we do very January. He got told over the phone so I called to set up a meeting the following day. The club immediately set that up, which was great of them to do that. I wanted to hear it face to face. They told me. Unfortunately it’s not going to be. I feel as though I’m in great nick, I’m playing well and I’ve got a couple of years to go. It’ll just have to be elsewhere.”


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:15 pm 
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For the Chelsea supporters gathered in the Matthew Harding Stand, life without John Terry is a prospect that couldn’t just happen without some kind of statement. The one they made ahead of this curiously desperate slugfest between two faded heavyweights took the form of a plan to pull up all the banners they usually hang from the upper tier hoardings with one conspicuous exception. The “JT Captain, Leader, Legend” message (looking a bit worn after all the years it must be said) fluttered alone as a show of solidarity to John Terry, the veteran who has been mulling over an unwanted farewell.

When their symbol came out to start the first home game since he admitted he expected to leave this summer the crowd bellowed hearty cheers and chanted “Sign him up.” Their support for a player who has represented their cause since making his debut in 1998 is understandable. The issue is an emotive one. And in some ways it is not just about Terry alone. Following on from the recent departures of José Mourinho, Frank Lampard, Didier Drogba and Petr Cech, the links to the classic identity of a Chelsea team capable of challenging at the top of the Premier League and winning the Champions League will be badly broken the day Terry exits.

Nobody represents modern Chelsea quite like their shaven headed, chest-out, cause-chasing, constantly cajoling centre back. They have supported him from the unsavoury to the unbeatable and everything in between. Letting go is not something that comes easily.

Not to the fans, and not to him either. “It’s a difficult one,” Terry said after the game. “The club is the most important thing but there’s no communication at the moment. I said what I had to say. That’s how it is. I’ve made it very clear I want to stay, but more important is getting up to where we should be in the table.”

This is quite an intriguing power play that seems to be developing here. To publicly lead the discussion about his future, by bringing it up in the first place a week ago, lamenting that there would be no “fairytale” ending to his long career at the club, and now shifting the angle by stating there was no communication since then, Terry has ignited a small fire. The Chelsea hierarchy, however, are unlikely to receive this kind of PR with warmth and cosy understanding.

Roman Abramovich was at Stamford Bridge watching this draw against Manchester United – the kind of fixture he always wanted when he first bought the club albeit not one with this understated flavour. The man who is ultimately responsible for who is chosen and who discarded from the staff at Stamford Bridge is hardly an owner who would be influenced by the bond on show between Terry and the fans. The support of the faithful for their old boss Mourinho was not a factor in the decision to sack Chelsea’s most successful manager, and it is not likely to make an impact in whatever happens with Terry either.

But the broader picture when looking at the Terry situation is that if on the one hand he symbolises everything about the ideal of a competitive, winning Chelsea, he also at the age of 35 symbolises how there is a current need to reconfigure the team in its current guise, which lacks the sharp edge of old. Terry is in reasonable form, but he is not the Terry of his pomp either which is not to be expected of any outfield player in his mid-thirties.

Despite the upturn since Guus Hiddink took temporary charge, and Diego Costa’s equaliser showed some character and ensured an undefeated run continues, Chelsea still look some distance below the standards they set in winning the title last season. Whichever manager gets the opportunity to get to work at Stamford Bridge in the summer, it is no small mission to retrieve the ground they have lost during this turbulent campaign.

In the meantime, Terry’s commitment goes on undimmed. It’s possible they will only see him lead the team out here for six more Premier League games, plus a number of cup games depending on how Chelsea fare against Manchester City in the FA Cup and Paris Saint-Germain in the Champions League.

He was involved in a typical charge during the first half which resulted in a penalty appeal. First came the thudding block, next the gallop upfield, and then the shot which ricocheted off Daley Blind’s elbow. Not given.

Later, once Costa had levelled Jesse Lingard’s opener for Manchester United, there was that expectancy when Terry ambled up for late set pieces in the driving rain. Everyone has seen how that movie usually ends countless times. Not on this occasion, but the bond between player and supporters swelled all the same at the end of it all. “We want you to stay” they crooned. He beat the badge on his chest.

For how much longer? Only Roman Abramovich can answer that one, which he will do in his own time and his own way.


Apparently earns £150k a week and wants that salary for another year.

Has been leader of a dressing room that has revolted to see off 3 managers (one of them twice) which has cost the club a small fortune

He might be a hero to the fans but I can see why the club don't want a man with that much power sticking around especially when his ability on the pitch is slipping.

Going public the way he has trying to force them in to a corner probably won't have gone down well either


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 11:16 pm 
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Exactly my point .. JT is influential figure and he may prove hindrance / disruptive element for whoever is taking chelsea job in summer..

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So true mate ...he is consistently inconsistent throughout his united career ..but what if he turns consistent ..he will get around 40 goals...ATM im waiting for that time as his age is 24/25 :wait: ... :|
on Rooney ,Jan 16th, ..and as they rest is history


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 11:32 pm 
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I don't think the decision to keep him around has ever been the managers decision.

Politically it's just so hard to get rid of him similar situation at Gerrard we had it with Keane.

When these huge influential players fade it's very hard to move them on and Terry is not only letting interested clubs know he's on the market he's also trying to strong arm the club into sorting his deal out or risk losing him.


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2016 9:39 am 
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Chelsea captain John Terry, 35, is close to agreeing a move to the Chinese Super League, where he will earn £12m a year, making him one of the highest paid players in the world. (Sun)

The Blues have handed Terry a £22,000 leaving present by waiving the booking fee for his farewell kickabout at Stamford Bridge on Monday.(Times - subscription required)


Not sure why chinese clubs would spend fortunes on defenders not likely to raise the profile to much especially one as old as Terry he's sort of yesterdays news really.

Seems like he's played his last game for Chelsea though as he's now banned for the final 2 games of the season after picking up his 2nd red card vs Sunderland.

While I don't like the man it's a bit of a shame he doesn't get a proper fairwell from his fans


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2016 2:19 pm 
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Club have come out and said he's been offered a new 1 year contract and is currently considering their offer.

This works 2 ways for me either Conte has decided he wants to keep him around or the club know he's done a deal somewhere else and are just making him an offer to save face a bit with the fans who seem to be firmly in the John Terry camp. They've put it on record to say they offered him a deal and if he rejects it and goes elsewhere then the club have done all they can to keep him.

My guess is the 1 year contract offer involves him taking a pay cut and accepting a role as a squad player rather than as a nailed on starter.


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2016 8:16 pm 
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John Terry cancelled a party due to be held on the pitch at Stamford Bridge on Monday, fuelling suspicions the Chelsea captain is increasingly inclined to take up the club’s offer of a one-year contract.

Terry had hired the pitch as well as the changing rooms and big screens for a game with close friends and Chelsea had waived the £22,000 fee for staging events at the venue. That party had initially been considered as part of his farewell to the club he has called home since he was 14. The 35-year-old cancelled it on Sunday while he considers the offer of a 12-month deal.

That proposal was made in talks between his agent, Paul Nicholls, the Chelsea chairman, Bruce Buck, and the director, Marina Granovskaia, last Wednesday. It came as a surprise to Terry, who had long feared he would be denied a chance to take his senior Chelsea career into a 19th season. Terry indicated on Friday the proposal is for “a different role” at the club, effectively a reduced involvement in the team and a lower wage. He is now weighing that offer against more lucrative deals proposed by clubs in China.

Shanghai, who are coached by the former England manager Sven-Goran Eriksson, and Jiangsu Suning are reported to be interested and would be able to offer two-year contracts worth about £20m. Terry considers his future to be in coaching and will resume his Uefa B licence course next week but he is keen to play on for at least another two seasons.

The defender, who missed the last two games of the Premier League campaign following his second red card of season, at Sunderland, took the microphone on the pitch at Stamford Bridge on Sunday after his team’s post-match lap of appreciation. He had to pause mid-speech as emotion got the better of him but ended up merely reinforcing his message that his preference is to remain at the club.

“We all want the same thing,” he said, with the owner, Roman Abramovich, watching. “I’ve said for a very long time I want to be here for the rest of my career. I want to finish my career here. We’ll have a few days and we’ll be speaking to the club. Listen, I want to stay. The club knows that, the fans know that. I want to stay.”


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 1:28 pm 
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Conte would be wise to get rid of him. Terry is far too strong a voice at Chelsea, and his performances no longer warrant the risk that he will stab the manager in the back.

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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2016 11:55 am 
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Signed a new 1 year deal at Chelsea.


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2016 6:26 pm 
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A man from the Daily Telegraph once told me an interesting story about John Terry, Fabio Capello and one of those informal chit-chats England managers like to have with journalists. This one took place a few years back, when Terry was having one of those off periods when he seems to be slightly falling to pieces, panels flapping, hinges rusting, grabbing at the passing shirts like a man groping for the light switch in the dark.

Someone asked why Capello kept picking Terry when his form was poor. The answer was simple. Yes, there were quicker, fitter players. But when Capello and his men looked around the dressing room before kick-off they usually found Terry was the only England player not frozen into silence, bowed with angst or – in the colloquialism used – “shitting it” under the weight of the England shirt.

Terry was unafraid. He made the others less afraid. You can see it, can’t you? No matter where you stand on the John Terry moral universe, he would still be a pretty good person to, say, come with you on the train to Birmingham to help give a PowerPoint presentation to an aggressively sceptical sales conference audience. Or to go out on a sky dive with, just the two of you up in some howling fuselage above the Arapaho National Forest, the japes, the backslaps, the emergency chute slung away – “Don’t need it, mate” – JT hurling himself out first into that screaming void still talking about Lewis Hamilton or The X Factor. “I’m coming, John. I’m coming with you. Catch me. Catch me, John.”

This ability to inspire from the front has been surplus to requirements during the current Chelsea run of seven league wins and six clean sheets. Just as for the first time in the Abramovich era, Terry’s absence through injury for a game as big as Saturday’s lunchtime trip to Manchester City is suddenly not really an issue, no longer a source of fretful speculation.

The news this week is that Conte plans to “phase out” his captain, with the suggestion Terry could even be off to Shanghai Shenhua in January. In a bizarro-world twist, Shanghai Shenhua are managed by Gus Poyet, the player Terry replaced to make his Chelsea league debut against Southampton 18 years ago, a sign, perhaps, of some late 1990s Chelsea Valhalla out there in the glare of the new world. Maybe Jody Morris and Michael Duberry are also in town and everyone’s off to Boujis later with Dane Bowers.

Either way, the signs are clear enough. Terry will turn 36 this week. He is by five years the longest serving current player at any Premier League club. He’s still out there: still leading, still captaining, still legending. But after 18 wild, glorious years the sense of an ending is now impossible to ignore.

Before we get lost in more formal goodbyes closer to the time, there are perhaps three things worth saying about the Terry years. First: hate him, loathe him or support Chelsea, this has been one of the great, unignorable English sporting lives of the current century. Terry has been relentlessly visible throughout the creation of a modern‑day powerhouse. Should Chelsea win another league title this season, they will be unarguably English football’s premier force since 2004, when Terry became captain and they first began to spend in earnest. In total Terry has now been present for 64% of Chelsea’s total accumulated silverware since the club were formed in 1905 as a fill-in for the empty Fulham Road stadium. This is in part Conte’s challenge: a first trophy outside the main span of the Terry Supremacy.

There has already been a change of tone and texture. The current three-man defensive wedge is mobile and aggressive. Whereas Terry has become more minimal with age, sitting deep, playing flatter, taking the air out of the game. In Chelsea’s last title campaign, he committed 13 fouls all season in the league, and made just over one tackle per 90 minutes.

He could perhaps have been a more striking, more expressive player in his best years. He might have used his ease on the ball to push his team forward: in 2011 Terry was rated the third most accurate passer in Europe; he still has more career goals than Andrés Iniesta. Instead he has pared back his game, playing within his limits and becoming an irresistibly familiar presence, the one constant through Chelsea’s modern triumphs those great, beaming hollering Terry features, victory sealed with the standard shots of triumphant post-match JT striding about shirtless, invariably cropped at the waist to give the unnerving impression of a man so committed to the cause he’s just played the full 90 minutes bullishly, unapologetically in the nude.

So much for the good times. The second thing about Terry is, of course, his toxic mistakes, his wider unpopularity. The scrapes, the splashes, the priapism: this is no more than lurid detail. But the FA ban for using racist language during a match will remain an indelible stain. The court case alone provided an extraordinary glimpse into the dismal internal monologue of the professional game. Terry has apologised and admitted that his language was completely unacceptable He is at least right there.

Beyond this, as the waters start to close above his head, the most striking thing about Terry is simply his basic presence in extraordinary times. In a way Chelsea have been a case study, an outlier for the eviscerating changes in English football. Billionaire ownership, the large-scale bartering of success, the bolting on of a new, aggressively burnished brand to our creaky old Victorian community centres: there is in principle something deeply odd and uncharted about this.

Just as being a billionaire is in itself inane – a process of being continually replete, existing within a sealed world of chinchilla‑skin helicopter rides and seven-star homogeneity – so the billionaire’s project club is also an inane idea and entirely anti-sport, a sanding down of edges and imperfections and thrilling variables into cold, hard, cash‑bought certainties. This is not sport. It’s not football. It doesn’t actually have to work at all.

Football can survive most things. But not the moment supporters stop caring about their club and its players. It is a challenge that is yet to hit but that always lurks just beyond the fringes and the fury. At Chelsea the age of Abramovich has worked so far, both as a spectacle and as a coherent whole that still feels like the same coherent whole. At times, at least in those raw early days, this has felt like it was in large part because of Terry’s vividness, his persuasive spirit, a player who has been not so much the brains or the heart of his club as its bowels, the hard colonic centre that ensures Chelsea have through it all still smelt like a football team.


It's a credit to Conte that no Chelsea fans are demanding he returns to the team although after that OG by Cahill today that might change


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 3:00 pm 
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John Terry was talking on 5live this weekend. What he had to say about ex-players becoming managers and coaches had a typically old-fashioned British flavour.

“I feel it’s very important we get the best players back in the game.”

Hold it right there big JT. A question needs to be asked. And that question is “why?”.

The vast majority of top managers were never the best players; in fact, the majority of managers at any level were not. There is no correlation between being a ‘best’ player and being a good coach, or manager, even though strands of the ex-player community seem to default to that notion.

This isn’t to say some ex-internationals cannot make great managers, as Antonio Conte and Mauricio Pochettino are proving, but that isn’t necessarily because they were excellent players, it’s because they’re good at coaching, and coaching and playing are two different skill sets.

It’s not important at all that “we get the best players back in the game”, it is important that we encourage, train and develop coaches and managers with talent and enthusiasm. Their playing career is largely irrelevant. If it wasn’t, you would not have the likes of Arsene Wenger, Jose Mourinho, Jurgen Klopp et al at the peak of the profession.

But Terry wasn’t done with in-depth analysis quite yet. He went on to say: “This generation of footballers have earned very good money throughout their time, and we need to make it easier for them to get into coaching roles – by not doing the full length of the FA coaching course.”

Why Terry has conflated how much they’ve earned with being fast-tracked into coaching roles is uncertain, except to inadvertently suggest that when you’ve several million in the bank you can’t be bothered to put all the graft in that those poor saps who were not “the best players” have had to put into being qualified to get a job. Nothing must get in the way of top, top players getting top, top jobs. Why does it have to be ‘easier’ for them?

It suggests a degree of unthinking, default entitlement. How good you were at playing football does not and should not allow you to do shorter coaching courses and have anything easier. Terry seems to be suggesting that experience as a ‘best player’ should allow you to bypass what mere mortals have to endure. But what would be the point in anyone being less well-trained? Also, who makes the decision which ex-player was ‘best’ enough to get fast-tracked?

The Paul Merson and Phil Thompson attitude to Marco Silva’s appointment has now been thoroughly ripped to shreds by all and sundry, but their knee-jerk reactions to the appointment of an overseas coach at Hull City who had a rather good, if relatively short CV, is part of this same weird insular culture that feels disenfranchised
by the presence of better-qualified, harder-working, well-travelled, educated but non-British talent, yet also feel they shouldn’t have to do the hard yards in order to become a coach, just because they’ve played for their country or won trophies with their clubs. It’s a losers’ mentality.

When Steven Gerrard was rumoured to be going to MK Dons as manager, opinion was split between thinking it was a good place to start working on your managerial chops, and those who thought it was somehow beneath him. And last week Ray Wilkins perfectly summed this up when talking about Frank Lampard.

“Obviously people have to take badges now to get involved in coaching, but I just think someone should take a chance with Frank now. Put him back in the Premier League, and let’s see where Frank can go in the Premier League. A lot of people say you should do your apprenticeship down in the lower leagues and find out what management is all about, but not for me. Someone like Frank, that has worked with world-class players and played with world-class players for the last ten years, should be working with those type of players. He understands their mentality, he understands how to get the best out of them.”

Obviously, this stands no scrutiny. But behind this, behind the attitudes to the Silva appointment, and the Ian Cathro appointment at Hearts, and many others, is a whole cultural hierarchy which puts top English (or Scottish in Cathro’s case) star ex-players above everyone else.

No-one is saying that ex-international players shouldn’t be training to be coaches, managers, or transcendental gurus, if they wish, but they should surely start from the basis that their playing career doesn’t automatically put them ahead of people who have not played at all, or at a high level. This lack of, not just of a meritocracy, but of even the acceptance of the concept of meritocracy when it comes to players like Lampard going into management, holds our game back like little else.

It enshrines privilege and it denies opportunity to others who may be more talented, but less monied and well-connected – something which is economically and culturally systemic in England, leading to a hardening of social mobility and enshrining of wealth. In fairness to Lampard and Gerrard, they haven’t proffered this notion, it’s always done for them by the likes of Wilkins.

Also, if we’re talking about English ex-internationals going into coaching roles with youth team and reserves, we have a right to ask exactly what positive experiences any of them can pass on via their stellar England experience?

“Yeah we all played shit at that tournament…and that one…and that one…and that one…and that one….then I was booed by my own fans….then they hung an effigy of me off a lamp-post…then the press called me names…then everyone said we were made to look much better than we are, by more talented foreign players at our clubs…then I retired from international football.”

If the roles for these ex-players are going to be detailed tactical instruction, coupled with man-management and psychological motivation, they need to be well-educated in a lot of different aspects of the game. You don’t just have to put the cones out to get your badges, and thus to become a competent manager. Having played away at Elland Road on a wet Tuesday night might have its uses, but it won’t help you when one of them tricky foreigns what don’t know the league, Jeff, switches tactics mid-game and makes you look like an idiot. Just shouting “energy” and pointing with gusto isn’t good enough anymore.

After all, who is the last ex-England international who became at least a very good manager? Kevin Keegan and Bobby Robson? Certainly, since the end of the 20th century, it’s a desert. And there are so few, not because they’ve been denied the opportunity by having to complete a full coaching course, but for a far more prosaic reason.

They. Were. Not. Good. Enough.

So much so that Paul Ince was passed over last week as England U-21 manager for Aidy Boothroyd, a decidedly not ‘best’ lower-league footballer, and a man who hardly has a stellar managerial reputation, despite once performing
heroics at Watford. Still judged a better bet than a man who bled from a head wound for his country, though. And that tells you everything.

In normal life, we all know that being great at something doesn’t make you great at teaching that said thing, often quite the opposite. These reactionary elements in British football need to catch up with reality, or will continue to look fantastically, ludicrously and almost comically out of touch.

John Nicholson


I don't think they should get fast tracked or special treatment they have enough time to start the course 2-3 years before they retire but they have to sort their ego out and be prepared to go down the divisions and fight their way back to the top they won't all get lucky like Guardiola or Zidane and walk into top jobs straight away.

Go to League One/Two and learn the ropes improve a team and then work your way up the fact that you've been a player should give you an advantage over those who haven't as you have experience of high level football as a player.

I wonder having seen what happened with Neville at Valencia if they're afraid to take the chance.

Like it or not there will only ever be 20 PL manager jobs and if you want one of those jobs you're competing with managers from all over the world for them a smart player who wants to give it a real go should be learning French/Spanish now while he's still playing as he might have to go abroad to take a job.


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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2017 3:23 pm 
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I wonder if the situation is different abroad. Generally speaking foreign players are stereotypically assuming to be more intelligent and more tactically astute than their English counterparts. I'd be interested to see if managers in the Spanish, French, Italian and German leagues had a higher proportion of ex-players amongst their ranks than in England.

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 Post subject: Re: John Terry: Skipper, Leader, Role Model & Loyal Friend
PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2017 3:55 pm 
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I think the issue is we have a culture of hiring foreign coaches in England whereas those countries have a culture of hiring coaches from within their own nation probably because fans aren't demanding an endless line of foreign managers so managers get a chance and if/when they fail they get another chance and another chance whereas in England you fail once and it's almost curtains. Italian clubs change managers every 5 minutes but they always seem to employ Italian managers you get the odd foreigner come in but it's rare. In Germany they have a culture of giving young managers a chance there's a guy managing in the Bundesliga who's 28 years old.

Use Swansea as an example they fired a young English manager, replaced him with an experienced Italian then they replaced him with an in-experienced American and now are back to an inexperienced English manager.

I don't think you can survive at these top clubs as players now without having that in depth tactical knowledge especially those guys who played at clubs who did well in CL. Terry, A. Cole, Lampard, Ferdinand, Hargreaves, Gerrard Carrick, Milner & Rooney as examples you'd be crazy to suggest these guys don't understand tactics is crazy. The only thing you could say is do English players know how to change tactics or are they just soldiers who do as they're told which might explain why the national team struggles.

I think the players just need to accept if they want a PL job they need to get the qualifications and then take jobs lower down the divisions and work their way up.

Check out this great quote from one of the greatest managers of the last century being a great player doesn't automatically make you a good manager you need to prove that you're a good manager

Sacchi was never a professional football player (he had played as a part-time footballer in amateur clubs for some years) and for many years worked as a shoe salesman. This led to his famous quote directed at those who questioned his qualifications: "I never realised that in order to become a jockey you have to have been a horse first".


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