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 Post subject: PFA ~ Salary Scandal
PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2015 8:14 pm 
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How much is Gordon Taylor paid? Last year he received a pay and benefits package of £3,368,653, made up of his salary of £2,932,615, £31,626 in benefits, and £404,412 in national insurance contributions. In 2013 he received a salary of £1,132,615, NI contributions of £233,775 and benefits of £34,769.

How does this compare with Premier League chief executives, Premier League footballers and other trade union leaders? According to Forbes the best-paid Premier League player is Wayne Rooney, who they estimate received a salary and bonuses last year totalling £12.75m. The average English top-flight player, however, received a comparatively meagre £2.2m in 2014, with players in the Championship averaging £500,000.

Not every Premier League club specifies the salary paid to their chief executives but in the year to June 2014 Tottenham paid their chairman, Daniel Levy, £2.17m, and Arsenal paid their chief executive, Ivan Gazidis, £2.19m. Others are paid considerably less: the highest-paid director at Everton gets £604,000 and at West Ham £636,000.

In 2001 Taylor’s salary was £319,671, and he received benefits totalling £138,699, making his total package five and a half times the £84,000 received by John Edmonds, then leader of the GMB union. By 2014 the salary paid to the GMB’s general secretary, now Paul Kenny, had risen to £121,000 – and Taylor package is 27.84 times greater.

Where does the money come from? The PFA has always received money from their members’ annual subscriptions and from the 1950s they have also received a percentage of Football League (and now Premier League) television income – originally 7%, rising to 10% in the 70s. When Premier League television deals started to generate large incomes, club chairmen moved to reduce this payment, and in 2001, after the agreement of a £550m-a-year TV package, they offered the PFA 1.5%, or £8.25m. This led to the threat of strike action, with Taylor complaining: “The Premier League wants to destroy the union. They are trying to wipe out the PFA because they don’t want any control over what they do.” The union finally accepted an offer of £17.5m a year. Their latest accounts show income of £534,180 from members’ subscriptions and television fees of £20,808,537, with total income of £22,525,121.

How long has he worked for the PFA? Taylor was first elected chairman in 1978, when he was a 33-year-old winger playing for Bury. He became assistant secretary following his retirement in 1980, and secretary the following year. Having been described by the Times in 1985 as “undoubtedly the most impressive administrator and negotiator in football” he was invited to apply to succeed Graham Kelly as chairman of the Football League three years later. Instead he decided to stay at the PFA after his salary was increased, again according to the Times, “to a level equivalent to the game’s other leading administrators”. That report added that “neither did he request nor does he require greater financial benefits to prolong his contribution” to the union.

How does Taylor justify his salary? In 2001 Taylor insisted that criticism of his pay was “archaic and insulting”. “I don’t see why I have to defend it. It is decided by the players as a salary for their union leader,” he said. In 2010 – when he received £1,143,464 – he insisted: “Why is it a problem if you get a good salary because you are a trade union leader as opposed to a captain of industry? Mine pales into insignificance compared to the bankers’.”

In 2014, Ross McEwan, the chief executive of the Royal Bank of Scotland, was paid £2.7m.

Is this the first time Taylor has been the centre of controversy? Throughout his leadership he has been criticised for defending players in public even for serious indiscretions. In doing so, earlier this year he controversially compared the convicted rapist Ched Evans with those who died at Hillsborough, saying they were an example of “person or persons to be found guilty and maintain their innocence and then been proved right”. He subsequently apologised.

His salary has been considered excessive for many years, with the then Birmingham City chairman, David Gold – now joint chairman of West Ham – accusing him in 2002 of “building a mausoleum to greed”. “This cash is coming from television monies awarded to the clubs which should be used to pay our players,” said Gold. “Instead a percentage is going to the union who then hand themselves big pay increases. It’s scandalous.”

In 2013 it was reported that he had run up a gambling debt of more than £100,000, after which his deputy, Bobby Barnes, insisted: “Gordon Taylor has done a tremendous job for football and footballers over the last 30 years.”

Have the PFA been accused of overspending before? In 1999 they controversially bought LS Lowry’s Going to the Match at Sotheby’s for £1,926,500, nearly four times a top estimate of £500,000. “We are trying to build up a collection of memorabilia – caps, medals, jerseys – and good football pictures,” Taylor explained. Ken Bates, then Chelsea chairman, raged: “If they can afford a £2m Lowry painting why do they need any more money – if, indeed, anything at all?”

Unrepentant, last year the PFA bought Lowry’s preparatory sketch for the painting.

What has been the backlash? “It proves how ludicrous the money washing around in football now is, when the guy who is meant to be sticking up for players’ rights is on the sort of salary that a Premier League striker is earning,” said Nigel Adams, Conservative MP for Selby & Ainsty and a member of the culture, media and sport select committee. “It is an extraordinary salary for anyone, let alone the head of a union.”


Pretty crazy that he takes home that sort of pay packet as the head of a union even if it is a union where most members earn above average wage and some earn millions.


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 Post subject: Re: PFA ~ Salary Scandal
PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 3:10 pm 
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That does seem a ludicrous amount. I'm intrigued as to what his job actually is. The only thing we ever hear of him is ill-though out quotes when he puts his foot in it.

As that MP said, it's representative of the silly amount of money in football nowadays. Contrary to what Taylor said when the issue arose in 2001, I believe he, or the Union, should have to justify the level of his pay packet. Fans are the main stakeholder in everything to do with the game. Without fans he wouldn't have a job, so I believe a level of justification should be expected. Won't happen though.

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 Post subject: Re: PFA ~ Salary Scandal
PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 6:34 pm 
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His job basically appears to be go in front of TV cameras and try to defend the often indefensible when footballers have f*cked up and are in the papers for the wrong reasons. He's the man that goes out and fronts up on their behalf even if it makes him look at t*t I think he often knows what he's saying is wrong but he does it to protect his member and that might be why they're happy for him to take home his massive salary.

The reality is I'm assuming he's an elected chairman and if the members think he's the right man for the job and deserves to take home that sort of salary (which they are paying as all the money for the PFA comes from it's members) then what's the problem?

Taylor's job is not to represent the fans his job is to look after professional and ex professional footballers the PFA gets a cut of the TV deal and obviously players all pay some sort of contribution to be a member an the PFA does great work looking after players who don't quite make the cut or get injured and have to retire early find new careers. He looks after league two and conference players who might only be taking home £500-1000 week which is still a very good salary but at 30-35 it's all over it's not enough to retire on.

If fans really want to drive change in football they need to stop going to games and cancel the TV subscriptions if 100,000 people suddenly rang up the club and said no to renewing a season ticket then rang up Sky/BT and said we're cancelling the sports package because we are sick of being ripped off then things would change very very quickly. What fans actually need is a union someone that represents everyone and it's only with safety in numbers that things will change but football fans are naturally divided by rivalries between clubs it's very hard to get fans groups to work together although the FSF have started to get a bit of traction with this but with PL football such a worldwide thing now the local fans power is even more dilluted.

As for the MP that is blatantly just a conservative MP trying to do a bit of point scoring by bashing a union but she's picked a very strange one to try and make a point on it's not like the footballers are going to threaten going on strike because the Tories are trying to cut their pensions!


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