AwayGoalsRule Football Forum

The Internet's Finest Football Forum

Get moneyback specials on your football betting at PaddyPower


It is currently Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:48 pm

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 60 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 4:17 pm 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 11:56 am
Posts: 7998
Location: 52 Festive Road
Highscores: 6
Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?

Probably, I'm quite fit :|


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 5:02 pm 
Offline
General
General
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 17205
Location: Over there.
Highscores: 2
Credit to Anton Hysen, a brave man. But that's in Sweden, not sure what the mood regarding homosexuals is over there? Still not sure if you'll be seeing any players come out in England, but there's a chance I suppose now they know they are not on their own. :dunno:

Mr Carrot wrote:
Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?

Probably, I'm quite fit :|


:lol:

_________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking.

Image
Image


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 5:37 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 11:53 am
Posts: 31154
Location: Milton Keynes
I imagine they're similar to the UK in being pretty liberal about it there will obviously be sections of swedes who don't like it but I imagine like here it's now accepted as part of modern life.

Fair play to the guy maybe he'll open the door for others to come out.

The real question is does it really matter that there may be footballers who are gay playing in our leagues?

I don't think they should feel pressured to come out publically even some well known hollywood stars don't want to be publically outed as they don't want to deal with the pressure that comes with it. Plus I doubt they want to be the posterboy for gay rights and all that stuff


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 6:13 pm 
Offline
Major General
Major General
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:28 pm
Posts: 11549
Highscores: 12
JSP wrote:
I don't think they should feel pressured to come out publically even some well known hollywood stars don't want to be publically outed...

Surely not (Tom Cruise) :ohmy:

_________________
Erik The Viking wrote:
I personally hope Corden dies in a house fire.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:09 pm 
Offline
First Lieutenant
First Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2008 6:36 pm
Posts: 1727
Location: Geordieland
Mr Carrot wrote:
Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?

Probably, I'm quite fit :|



:laugh: :fonz:


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:15 pm 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 6:57 pm
Posts: 6512
Mr Carrot wrote:
Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?

Probably, I'm quite fit :|


:rolleyes:

_________________
ImageImage


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:18 pm 
Offline
AGR Poster Of The Year
AGR Poster Of The Year
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:08 pm
Posts: 3870
Location: Whitehall, PA USA
Mr Carrot wrote:
Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?

Probably, I'm quite fit :|

I liked this joke better a week ago when Reedo made it :coffee: :p


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:19 pm 
Offline
AGR Poster Of The Year
AGR Poster Of The Year
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:08 pm
Posts: 3870
Location: Whitehall, PA USA
Serbinator wrote:
JSP wrote:
I don't think they should feel pressured to come out publically even some well known hollywood stars don't want to be publically outed...

Surely not (Tom Cruise) :ohmy:

Rumor has it John Travolta is in the group too. Both Scientologists, MOTWYW


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:40 pm 
Offline
Lieutenant Colonel
Lieutenant Colonel
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2008 11:14 am
Posts: 3558
Location: Bangor, N.I.
Personally, I will refuse to watch any matches involving gay footballers. That way I will never have to watch Ashley Cole again.

_________________
F*** you Brazil!


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:42 pm 
Offline
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2008 12:50 am
Posts: 1480
:|

When he acts like this , yes it bothers me ,and his opponent looks a bit bottered to me .

Click The Link...http://www.dumpert.nl/mediabase/1395661/37e5a445/voetballers_intiem.html

_________________
Man is not made for working , no matter what you do you are always one hand short


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 1:00 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 41339
Location: Cloud Cuckooland
Highscores: 3
Niklas Tidstrand on gay footballer and teammate Anton Hysen: "It's hard to have something inside you that's really big."


:snigger:

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImageImage

ImageImage
Quote:
Goodnight, thank you, and may your god go with you


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 6:24 pm 
Offline
General
General
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 17205
Location: Over there.
Highscores: 2
fire extinguishers wrote:
:|

When he acts like this , yes it bothers me ,and his opponent looks a bit bottered to me .

Click The Link...http://www.dumpert.nl/mediabase/1395661/37e5a445/voetballers_intiem.html


Was that the gay player getting his nuts squeezed? Ouch.

_________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking.

Image
Image


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:17 pm 
Offline
Captain
Captain
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:50 pm
Posts: 2183
Location: Nowhere man
not really...reedo doesnt bother me so why should a footballer :rolleyes:

_________________
sitting on a cornflake...waiting for the van to come !


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2011 2:49 am 
Offline
AGR Poster Of The Year
AGR Poster Of The Year
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:08 pm
Posts: 3870
Location: Whitehall, PA USA
Report: Suns CEO Welts says he's gay
Rick Welts aims to mentor gay people who want to work in sports.

 
 
 
 
 
--
Updated May 16, 2011 11:58 AM ET
NEW YORK (AP)
Phoenix Suns president and CEO Rick Welts revealed to the public that he is gay in a story posted on The New York Times' website Sunday, saying he wants to break down one of the last significant social barriers in sports.

Welts' declaration is the latest development on a subject has gained attention in the sports world recently, after Lakers star Kobe Bryant's use of a gay slur on the basketball court and NHL player Sean Avery's public support of same-sex marriage.


Welts talked to NBA commissioner David Stern, WNBA president Val Ackerman, Hall of Famer Bill Russell and Suns guard Steve Nash before discussing his sexual orientation with a reporter from the Times, the newspaper said. All of them offered Welts their support.

''This is one of the last industries where the subject is off limits,'' the longtime executive told the paper. ''Nobody's comfortable in engaging in a conversation.''

The Suns did not offer a statement Sunday when contacted by The Associated Press. Messages left with Welts' public relations team were not returned.

Welts is one of the most prominent figures active in sports to openly declare that he is gay, although there has yet to be an active player in the NBA, Major League Baseball or the NFL to make such a statement. Some athletes have done so after their playing careers.

The 58-year-old Welts, who began his career as a ball boy for the Seattle SuperSonics, spent several years with Stern in the league office. He was the architect of the All-Star Weekend and helped raise the NBA's profile before leaving for the Suns' front office.

Welts told Stern about his sexual orientation during a meeting in New York last month. The next day, Bryant responded to a technical foul by calling referee Bennie Adams a ''f-----'' during the third quarter of a game against San Antonio - touching off a firestorm of controversy and underscoring the taboo nature of the subject in sports.

The Lakers star was fined $100,000; Bryant has since offered multiple apologies.

Also last month, Atlanta Braves coach Roger McDowell allegedly made homophobic comments, crude gestures and threatened a fan with a bat before a game in San Francisco. McDowell served a two-week suspension and also apologized for his remarks.

Then there was Avery, the outspoken New York Rangers agitator, who offered his support for same-sex marriage in a video as part of the New Yorkers for Marriage Equality campaign.

Hockey agent Todd Reynolds tweeted that it was ''Very sad to read Sean Avery's misguided support of same-gender 'marriage.' Legal or not, it will always be wrong.'' Damian Goddard, who hosted a show on Rogers Sportsnet in Canada, tweeted his support for Reynolds and was fired.

Among the only people Welts opened up to were his parents and younger, only sibling, Nancy - although Stern said he had a feeling his friend was gay. Stern even telephoned Welts after his longtime partner, Arnie, died from complications of AIDS in 1994.

Now, after all these years, Welts has decided it's time to come out of the shadows.

''What I didn't say at the time was: I think there's a good chance the world will find this unremarkable,'' Stern told the Times, recalling their meeting in which Welts revealed he was gay. ''I don't know if I was confusing my thoughts with my hopes.''

Welts said he told Nash because they hold each other in high professional regard. According to the newspaper, Nash was tipped off about what Welts wanted to discuss and was surprised only because he thought everyone already knew that Welts was gay.

''I think it's a shame, for all the obvious reasons, that this is a leap that he has to take,'' Nash said. ''Anyone who's not ready for this needs to catch up. ... He's doing anyone who's not ready for this a favor.''


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 3:21 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 41339
Location: Cloud Cuckooland
Highscores: 3

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImageImage

ImageImage
Quote:
Goodnight, thank you, and may your god go with you


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2012 10:00 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 41339
Location: Cloud Cuckooland
Highscores: 3
We've been waiting for a long time for a TV programme about gay footballers, but when it comes, Patty(TINH) isn't impressed. The issue needs much better than this...

Image

What's that you say? You'd like to watch a programme about why there are no openly gay footballers? Well, you're in luck, because there's one on Monday made by the niece of Justin Fashanu.

Perhaps this is an issue not much discussed in the mainstream, but we've certainly talked about it a lot on AGR over the years, and in some detail too. None of the points made in this hour were profound or eye-opening. It's all pretty basic stuff.

Pretending you know less than you actually do is one way of getting people to tell you more than they really want to. Sadly, it does not really work for Amal Fashanu, the daughter of John. Not to be nasty, but she comes across as being extremely naïve, even for a 22-year-old model with rich parents.

Observations like: "it grew into a very heated match with both sets of fans singing and shouting all way through," do not suggest someone who is exactly immersed in the culture of the sport. That wouldn't necessarily matter if she had better direction and guidance from the producers.

Her first interviewees about the old "where are all the gay footballers?" chestnut are her pals in fashion, including one unintentionally comical camp man in a tall pointy hat who says "football is the gayest of all sports" what with those baths and showers etc. Uh-huh.

Next interview for our intrepid reporter is, erm, her dad. John Fash-the-Bash (which does sound like one of those 19th century euphemisms for a gay sexual act) says there's more chance of the next Pope being black than of a footballer coming out as gay. We'd take that bet actually. Still, you can't argue with the access! Amal even interviews her own mum, and her friend Finky or Slufie or something - who has nothing whatsoever to do with football - when they go shopping for shoes. Like, this is so totally like literally BBC3 that you know like you might want to like literally punch yourself in the face.

It's all fairly superficial stuff. You know the basics. You can't come out because crowds would slag you off, players would loathe you, managers would try to bum you after drinking brandy.

There are definitely some moments of excellent accidental comedy, for instance in her interview with John McGovern, whose response at being challenged to be appalled that Brian Clough referred to Justin Fashanu as "a puff" is to laugh out loud. Now, there's nothing funny about bullying or bigotry or belittling someone because of their sexuality but...well...the McGovern thing is pretty funny. Sorry if that makes us appalling human beings.

What is not considered here is that maybe there are almost no gay footballers. Maybe they're put off early or don't fancy it. The old canard about "one in ten people being gay" is trotted out, but is there really any reason to suppose that any profession should have a representative proportion of gay participants?

Such programmes usually have Max Clifford on and this is no exception. He says he's known of five or six gay or bisexual footballers over the last 15-20 years, which is supposed to support the programme's line that there are all these tortured souls in the dressing room closet, but does it not in fact rather prove that your gay footballer is a very, very rare creature?

Amal goes to Brighton and is shocked by Leeds fans' 'gay' chanting at Brighton supporters. She says it's hostile. Matt Lucas refuses to agree that "we can see you holding hands" is a hideous crime against humanity. As for "does your boyfriend know you're here?", well, there are probably worst things being done by humans to other humans this week. Leeds fans are almost certainly doing worse things to somebody right now.

As this goes out on BBC3, the home of such sophisticated fare as 'F*** Off I'm Fat', we imagine there is a stipulation that at some point someone has to cry. Crying proves you mean it. Tears here come when Amal sees a documentary of her father about his difficult relationship with his brother. All fine and dandy but not really helping in discussing why gay footballers can't come out, if revealing of other issues. Like, private issues? To be dealt with in private? Ach, maybe we're just too old for this TV thing.

In the end there's an interview with the FA's 'Equality Manager', who said they had a four-year plan to portray gay people positively. What would they do if a gay footballer was a total bastard though? Don't ask that. All gay people are lovely. It all sounded like the sort of corporate-speak that is all too typical from a big organisation who know Something Must Be Done but doesn't know what.

Joey Barton pops up and does his "beat poet of the people shtick" and is rewarded by being called "a genuine big-name footballer". He's got a gay uncle and he loves him. Aw great. We like Joey, at least as an artistic construct, a cipher, a shaman. We doubt there is anything he would not be prepared to talk about on camera, up to an including How To Mend a Mellotron.

For this programme, being gay meant being male. The gay female footballer was a foreign country not even acknowledged. Women play professional football and are gay. This programme should have acknowledged that.

It strikes us that if you are gay, you might get fed up with people always telling you how to live. Telling you that you should be out, or in, or whatever. Everyone has an agenda it sometimes seems. It must be bloody annoying.

We're sure there are a small amount of gay players and that there are plenty of idiots who would give them grief about it if they came out. However, Matt Lucas made perhaps the most cogent point, saying that a popular gay player would be defended by his own fans against negative chanting and eventually his gayness would become boring and be eventually forgotten. Although there's no doubt that someone would be making a rather witless documentary about it...

Britain's Gay Footballers, Monday, 9pm, BBC3

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImageImage

ImageImage
Quote:
Goodnight, thank you, and may your god go with you


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:43 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 41339
Location: Cloud Cuckooland
Highscores: 3
The Football Association is responsible for a climate of homophobia in the game, according to former NBA basketball player John Amaechi.

The governing body launches a new six-year inclusion and anti-homophobia plan on Monday with no openly gay players among almost 3,000 professionals.

But Amaechi, who came out in 2007 and has been vocal in his criticisms of football's attitude towards homosexuality, says the issue will only be solved by greater diversity among the FA board members - not "posters and platitudes".

Quote:
The FA plans to use a new video discussing homophobia in football ,
which features former players John Scales, Brendan Batson and Aidy Williams.


It recently fined former Leicester City player Michael Ball £6,000 after he tweeted homophobic comments and has charged West Ham's Ravel Morrison in a similar case.

Fans have also been banned after homophobic chanting at a game between Southampton and Brighton, and others have been arrested at a recent game involving Millwall and Brighton.

But Amaechi says the FA should stop pointing the finger at others and accept it is to blame.

He told BBC Sport: "I don't understand why football fans aren't more angry by the way they are portrayed by the football authorities.

"If you look at the first horrible video they did on anti-homophobia, it made it very clear that the problem lies with you. You stupid, blue-collar people in the terraces. It's you stupid urban, re black, people on the field. It's your fault.

"Then they sit in their boxes and their boardrooms and all the attention is deflected away from them.

"Well, it's 2012 and they have just appointed their first woman to the board. Does that really tell you they are a progressive organisation or they are now reacting to the fact the focus is starting to shift on to them?

"A board that has just voted a woman on to the board in 2012 is not progressive. They are by definition the problem."

Professional Footballers' Association chairman Clarke Carlisle also thinks the FA needs to make a stand.

He told BBC Sport: "The responsibility lies with the national governing body. They need to make sure they set the precedent of levels of acceptance.

"Then the onus is on the players union, the football leagues, and the individual clubs to disseminate those messages."

The FA's Head of Equality, Sue Law, explained the organisation's plans.

She said: "The FA's action plan, 'Opening Doors and Joining In', is about football's commitment to inclusion and anti-homophobia.

"That sits alongside our intention for the game to draw from a wide and diverse talent pool [in terms of appointing board members and administrators].

"There is support and commitment across this agenda from all areas of the FA with the likes of [England women's manager] Hope Powell and Gareth Southgate contributing to the action plan resources.

"We're seeking to create a 'so-what?' environment and the action plan has had input from groups such as Pride Sports, Justin Campaign, Gay Football Supporters Network, Stonewall and Kick It Out."

But gay-friendly teams such as London-based Stonewall FC and Village Manchester FC believe the FA is not engaging with them.

Both feature gay and straight players in the same side and have found no opposition to playing in leagues against straight teams.

But they feel their examples are not promoted as an example of improving inclusion in football.
Continue reading the main story

Quote:

Our club has been transformative to so many people... because they are in an environment where they are not made to feel uncomfortable

Antony Lockley
Manager of gay-friendly team Village Manchester FC


Carlisle agrees that the FA board needs to be more reflective of society. But the Northampton Town defender added: "I don't think it is fair to say that a straight, white, old man can't make representative decisions.

"With the right input of course he can, but we need to make sure the right people are around him to for him to get to that decision."

The launch comes against a backdrop in the English game where all 20 Premier League teams have recently signed the government's Sports Charter to tackle homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia in sport.

But only 16 of 92 professional clubs, including six Premier League teams, have been willing to openly back the Justin Campaign's Football v Homophobia initiative, which marks the birthday of Justin Fashanu -
the only openly gay footballer in Britain - who subsequently committed suicide in 1998.

The campaign aims "to challenge the stereotypes and misconceptions that exist around lesbian, gay, bisexual & transgender people and work towards a future where the visibility of LGB&T people in football is both accepted and celebrated."

The Justin Campaign's Alan Duffy said the 16 backers were a "big improvement" after receiving no support from top-flight clubs last season.

Despite recent instances of players being fined, Carlisle thinks the majority would be "fantastically supportive" of an openly gay colleague now.

Having spoken to gay players on an anonymous basis, Carlisle believes the greatest apprehension to coming out would be the reaction in the stands.

But consultant and public speaker Amaechi, who last year was awarded an OBE, says the example of the alleged racial incident between Chelsea captain John Terry and QPR's Anton Ferdinand, shows that football fans are not to blame.

"These cases of racism are being pointed out by fans in the stands, not by officials, not by team-mates on the field," he added. "They deserve a little more credit for where they are in society.

"They have brothers and sisters and parents that are gay and they don't think it is an issue any more."

Amaechi says the new strategy lacks the backing of current players or a senior figure in football.

He added: "If the FA are really serious about ending bigotry, how about they talk to a scientist about how that is done rather than talking to another PR company?

"You are not going to end bigotry through posters and platitudes. If they come up with another video and tell you that's part of their strategy, it's just nonsense.

"Sir Alex Ferguson came out the other day and said very explicitly that racism was completely unacceptable and that, in his opinion, it was something that he would work to eradicate.

"We've never heard that kind of explicit statement from people of his stature about homophobia."

_________________
ImageImageImageImageImageImage

ImageImage
Quote:
Goodnight, thank you, and may your god go with you


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2012 7:18 am 
Offline
General
General
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 17205
Location: Over there.
Highscores: 2
Sucky Sucky Mime Mime

While Sweden have Anton Hysen, the only 'out' gay footballer currently playing, we suspect there is still a bit of work to do in that area in neighbouring Norway.

For on Sunday Valerenga striker Marcus Pedersen scored for his side in their 3-1 win over Stabaek, and chose to celebrate in the time-honoured fashion - by seeming to shouting 'GAYS' at the home fans and making the unmistakable and universally recognised sign for...ahem...the oral physical act of love.

Observe here.

_________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking.

Image
Image


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2013 5:18 pm 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 11:53 am
Posts: 31154
Location: Milton Keynes
Quote:
Image

When Corinthians forward Emerson posted a photo on Instagram of himself playfully kissing a friend, he could barely have imagined the repercussions it would cause. This sort of thing is hardly uncommon in Brazil, after all; many of the country’s footballers spend their down time sharing their lives on social networking sites.

So what was so different this time? Nothing really, and yet apparently everything. The friend was a man.

“F*** off and kiss somewhere else; this is a place for men,” read one sign. “No gays,” howled another. Then the chants started. “Go and find a woman to kiss.” “We don’t accept homosexuals.”

There were only five men picketing the Corinthians training complex but they made the noise of 20. Members of the club’s Camisa 12 (12th Man) supporters’ group had seen the photo and felt compelled to show their outrage. “It’s not homophobia or anything, we just don’t want it here,” said one of the men, sounding… er… completely homophobic.

Sadly, this isn’t a minority view in Brazilian football, where prejudice against homosexuals is rife. It resides mainly in the mass (you can hardly spend five minutes in a stadium without hearing the referee/opposition left-back/anyone in hearing range described as viado, a pejorative term for gay people) but also in supposedly more lofty confines.

In 2007, Palmeiras director José Cyrillo Júnior insinuated on a talk show that Richarlyson, a player for rivals São Paulo, was gay. The player – who has since had to cope with all manner of abuse from opposition fans, despite denying the accusation – took Cyrillo to court, where the judge himself came out with this cracker: “Football is a macho, virile… not homosexual.”

This, of course, is symptomatic of a deeper malaise in Brazilian society. The outré extravagance of Carnaval celebrations may kid you that the country is some great bastion of acceptance, but the reality is rather different. This is a country in which Marco Feliciano, the elected president of the Commission for Human Rights and Minorities, has been trying to push through legislation known widely as the 'Gay Cure' – a depressingly self-explanatory title.

When NBA star Jason Collins came out earlier this year, it prompted some soul-searching among the more right-minded football fans in Brazil (of which, it should be pointed out, there are plenty). “There have been rumours about players being silenced by their clubs when they were ready to come out,” Trivela columnist Felipe Lobo sighed earlier this year. “It’s shameful. Football is living in the past.”

But the movement for acceptance has at least gained one high-profile name this week in Emerson, who has hit out at his critics. “It’s an idiotic prejudice,” he told sports daily Lance! “It was something natural – that was Emerson the person, not Emerson the footballer.”

He makes for a somewhat incongruous good samaritan, it must be said. Nicknamed 'Sheik'due to having spent a portion of his career in the Middle East, Emerson is something of a rabble-rouser: past infractions include gnawing on an opponent’s arm and getting thrown out of former club Fluminense for singing a song of exaltation about bitter rivals Flamengo – on the Flu team bus.

(He also has a pet monkey called Cuta, whose views on sexual diversity are said to be rather more advanced than those of the five Corinthians fans.)

But players like Emerson can only do so much. One day someone is going to have to come crashing out of the closet to shock narrow-minded Brazilians out of their inertia. Whoever it is, I wish them luck. They’ll need it.

Jack Lang writes about Brazilian football for the Guardian, ESPN FC, When Saturday Comes and WhoScored, among others.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 11:35 am 
Offline
General of the Army
General of the Army

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 11:53 am
Posts: 31154
Location: Milton Keynes
Quote:
Footballers in England and Scotland have been invited to support a campaign addressing homophobia by wearing rainbow laces in their boots.

Laces have been sent to all 92 Premier League and Football League clubs, plus the 42 professional teams in Scotland, by gay rights charity Stonewall.

The Right Behind Gay Footballers campaign wants players to wear the laces in games on 21 and 22 September.

Its focus is on changing attitudes rather than urging players to come out.

Stonewall deputy chief executive Laura Doughty said: "It's time for football clubs and players to step up and make a visible stand against homophobia in our national game.

"By wearing rainbow laces, players will send a message of support to gay players and can begin to drag football into the 21st Century."

In February, the Football Association issued a toolkit to clubs to help combat homophobia in the game.

But, a month later, only 29 of 92 professional clubs in England were actively engaged in the Football v Homophobia campaign.

There are no known openly gay footballers in the English and Scottish professional leagues.

However, QPR midfielder Joey Barton is backing the campaign, appearing in promotional material and taking to Twitter to push the cause.

He wrote: "Join the rainbow laces movement. Sexuality in sport should not be an issue in the 21st century."

Former Leeds and United States winger Robbie Rogers announced he was gay earlier this year but only after retiring, claiming he could not have continued his career because of the "pack mentality" that affects the way footballers behave.

He later reversed his decision to quit the game and signed for LA Galaxy.

Before the American's revelation, only two footballers had publicly said they were gay.

In 1990, former England Under-21 international Justin Fashanu became the first professional footballer in Britain to come out. He took his own life eight years later, aged 37.

Swedish lower league player Anton Hysen, the son of former Liverpool defender Glenn Hysen, also came out in an interview with a Swedish football magazine in 2011.


Assuming their sponsors don't have a problem with it I can see quite a few players getting behind the campaign


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 60 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron