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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 11:56 am 
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I'm surprised they haven't already been wearing rainbow laces the way they like their coloured footwear nowdays.
Gays.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:59 pm 
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An anti-homophobia group urging players to wear rainbow boot laces this weekend has been criticised for using messages which rely on "sexualised innuendo and stereotypes about gay men".

Gay rights campaigners Stonewall launched the initiative, Right Behind Gay Footballers, which is backed by a leading chain of bookmakers.

But other equality bodies are concerned about language used by the campaign.

Some clubs, such as Manchester United, have chosen not to wear the laces.

But Everton, who are sponsored by the same bookmakers, have said some of their players will wear them.

Toffees manager Roberto Martinez said: "The players are well aware of the meaning of the campaign and we are happy to support it."

Queens Park Rangers midfielder Joey Barton has also backed the campaign, which has received a positive response on social media sites.

Stonewall sent laces to all 92 professional teams in England and 42 professional teams in Scotland on Monday and is also promoting a billboard campaign around the UK.

But Football v Homophobia (FvH), another body aiming to improve education on the subject and who rejected the chance to work on this initiative, said terms such as 'Right Behind Gay Footballers' reinforced "stereotypes that ensure homophobia exists" and "blurred the territory" between homophobic language and football banter.

FvH said a number of people had already written innuendo-laden phrases on bookmaker Paddy Power's Facebook page.

It also said Brighton and Hove Albion Supporters' Club had recently called on authorities to help tackle homophobic abuse at Brighton games which was often dismissed as 'banter'.

"We applaud the sentiments behind the idea central to the 'Rainbow Laces' campaign, namely solidarity with gay players," FvH said in a statement.

"[But] we feel it is incongruous to run a campaign aiming to change football culture whilst using language which reinforces the very stereotypes and caricatures that, in the long term, ensure that homophobia persists."

Stonewall told BBC Sport they teamed up with Paddy Power because they can "talk the language of fans and players" and, while the slogan might be risque, the "overall message was to make sure that homophobic abuse does not have a place in the game."

A spokesman said: "We don't think it's comparable to the worst abuse. Overall, it is encouraging and engaging support for gay players and attempts to kick homophobia out of football."

While several clubs BBC Sport has spoken to regarded the campaign as raising an important issue, the lack of notice given them and the campaign's links to a bookmaker known for publicity stunts have caused a few problems.

In 2012, Paddy Power had a TV advert suspended after it encouraged viewers to guess the gender of women at the Cheltenham horse racing festival.

Paddy Power's involvement has also presented problems for clubs backed by different betting partners, while some clubs have said they will continue to support key issues via groups like Kick it Out.

A spokesman for the bookmaker said Stonewall was consulted throughout the project and they were careful to try to strike the right balance between a campaign that would make an impact and one that would not cause offence.

He added it was the bookmaker's belief that there was no place for homophobia in football and the response from Stonewall and the Gay Football Supporters Network had been positive so far.

The Premier League said in a statement that it would leave it up to individual clubs and players to decide whether they should support new campaign.

It said: "The underlying message behind this campaign is a good one. Indeed, we and our clubs have worked hard with government and other stakeholders to ensure the whole equalities agenda is something we are fully aware of and engaged in.

"However, we were not consulted about this particular campaign. Had we been involved earlier in the process, we could have worked with Stonewall... and would be happy to talk to them in the future to discuss ways in which we could work together."


I think they could have done a bit more to promote it and get more people involved as the homophobic abuse needs to stop if we want everyone to be able to enjoy going to the game as it should be a sport for everyone.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 5:01 pm 
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What would the civil rights movement have looked like without team sports? Significantly different, is the answer – stripped of one of its most potent battlegrounds. Team sports, most notably baseball, were such a visible nexus between the struggle for racial equality and the wider America, and the scene of some of the civil rights movement's earliest and most emotionally resonant gains. Jackie Robinson broke baseball's colour line in 1947 – a little over 10 years later, the percentage of black players on major league baseball teams exceeded the percentage of black Americans in the general population.

And so to today's question: what would the gay rights movement today look like without team sports? The answer, unfortunately, is that it would look a whole lot more successful. The percentage of out gay people in the general population so far outstrips the percentage of out gay people in professional team sports that the positioning of the decimal point becomes an embarrassment. Team sports eat the dust of social change these days, with every major legal milestone won off the pitch only drawing attention to the repressed yesterworld on it.

Football, for all its economic libertarianism and endlessly trumpeted modernity, is in this aspect socially backward. Of course, it isn't only football – rugby (union and league) and cricket have almost as dismal a record, as do team sports with lesser profiles. For all the influx of money and the futuristic pretensions of the past few decades, our most popular sport remains anachronistically rooted in the 20th century, while the rest of society progresses incrementally each year, a movement which only serves to highlight the widening gap. In Tuesday's Times, Matthew Parris observed that "anyone could have guessed that in the out-and-proud league, the world of sport would have lagged some way behind the world of ballet or show business, but I've been astonished to see it lag behind even the world of politics".

Still, football's ultra-conservatism is matched only by its ability to turn almost every conversation into one about itself. Tom Daley's video announcement that he was in a relationship with a man had barely hit the news this week before people were inevitably asking the so-called big one: "Yes, but what does this mean for football?"

Daley's going public has been widely hazarded to be a Good Thing for football, in that it might possibly, at some unspecified point, encourage one of the poor players who feel forced to carry a miserable secret feel more able to unburden themselves of it. But not yet. The advice from out-sportsman-turned-psychologist John Amaechi is to leave it till you retire, on the basis that being yourself still isn't anywhere near worth the trouble.

For a sport obsessed with ProZonery, quasi-sabermetrics and the cumulative value of eliminating even tiny disadvantages, I shouldn't think football has spent ten quid thinking about the potential detrimental financial impact to its "product" of players performing while carrying secret burdens or living this sort of lie (economic impact being the only language which experience suggests it cares to understand).

Then again, if you ever wonder quite how much of a toss top-flight football actually gives about the issue, you need only look at the pathetic response to Stonewall's innocuous recent campaign, which attempted to get as many players as possible to wear rainbow laces in games one weekend to highlight homophobia in the game. That the laces were delivered to the various grounds in Paddy Power boxes – despite being themselves unbranded – was sufficient for a whole slew of clubs to declare themselves out. (Out in the Dragons' Den sense – not out in "that way", obviously.) In fact, as mentioned in this column at the time, the responses from the clubs who felt they couldn't possibly get involved in such a gentle stunt were eerily similar – almost as if centrally controlled. Tottenham regretted there had been "no prior consultation with us and the Premier League", Chelsea lamented the "lack of consultation", Fulham pointed out "this campaign was initiated without consultation with clubs and the league"… and so on.
But why should they get their knickers in such a twist about "consultation" with the sainted Premier League, if they wanted simply to give their players the option of wearing some rainbow laces on a single afternoon? Ah well. When they find the absolutely perfectly acceptable pro-gay campaign, in precisely the packaging they prefer, and have cleared even the mildest detail with their Premier League overlords, then doubtless they'll let us know.
Still, it'll be a bit late, won't it? When the day finally comes that players can feel confident about coming out at any stage of their career, team sports will merely have caught up with social change, as opposed to being able to claim any meaningful part in its worthier victories. At the current rate of progress, gay people could have won the immensely complex battle of full equality under the law before a single out player has started a Premier League game – which is a funny order for things to have shaken down in, if not in a ha-ha sort of way.
Whoever would have thought that team sports were once one of the first arenas in which prejudicial barriers were broken down, as "different" types of people played side by side at the highest level in a way that made a mockery of wider society's insistence on clinging to those differences? It's almost as if, after the great progress made in the fight for racial equality, there was some pulling up of the drawbridge to prevent the cause of gay freedom being advanced in similar fashion.


Some people are so obsessed with this a man/women's sexuality is their business and no one else's if they want to reveal it publically that is their choice. Has anyone actually made a point of asking every footballer if he's straight or do we just assume they all are?

I imagine in the majority of male dominated industries revealing you're a homosexual is tough and something you may decide to keep private as your private life has nothing to do with work.

It's 2013 I think fans would be fine if a player came out everyone knows that sort of abuse is off limits but like racism you might get the odd idiot who steps out of line and gets punished for it.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:17 pm 
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JSP wrote:
Some people are so obsessed with this a man/women's sexuality is their business and no one else's if they want to reveal it publically that is their choice.

I imagine in the majority of male dominated industries revealing you're a homosexual is tough and something you may decide to keep private as your private life has nothing to do with work.

It's 2013 I think fans would be fine if a player came out everyone knows that sort of abuse is off limits but like racism you might get the odd idiot who steps out of line and gets punished for it.


Exactly. Good post. :thumbup:

As for rainbow laces lol, gimmie a break.

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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2013 12:37 am 
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Nothing wrong with the rainbow laces imo it's like the kick it out campaign.

It's the will to make someone the poster boy/girl for homosexuals in football that bugs me. It adds way more pressure to someone who might want to come out but doesn't want the responsibility of being that person.

I found out the other day that Nicola Adams the Olympic gold medallist boxer is a lesbian does it matter? No it doesn't so why should it for a footballer.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 06, 2013 4:02 pm 
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JSP wrote:
Nothing wrong with the rainbow laces imo it's like the kick it out campaign.

It's the will to make someone the poster boy/girl for homosexuals in football that bugs me. It adds way more pressure to someone who might want to come out but doesn't want the responsibility of being that person.

I found out the other day that Nicola Adams the Olympic gold medallist boxer is a lesbian does it matter? No it doesn't so why should it for a footballer.


What you mean pointless? :rolleyes:

I know what you mean. Though obviously lessening abuse over these issues is worth thinking about, I don't necessarily think encouraging/pressuring people to publicly disclose their sexuality will help achieve this.

Discrimination is discrimination, therefore wrong, and there's no such thing as a positive version imo so just leave them be. I don't see how pestering gay people to 'come out' and admit to their homosexuality is any different from pestering them for being actually gay? They're still being bothered due to their sexual preferences.

I can't help thinking that whoever is behind this campaign could learn their own lesson of tolerance here. You can just imagine the outcry if a straight bloke demanded that all gays should admit to it! :stop:

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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 4:18 am 
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The Football Association was forced on Thursday night to defend the appointment of the former player Michael Johnson to its new Inclusion Advisory Board, aimed at promoting equality in the game, after he stated in 2012 that homosexuality was "detestable".
Johnson, who played for Birmingham City, Derby and Notts County as a defender, will meet the other nine members of the IAB for the first time this month after the establishment of the panel in December. It is chaired by the FA board member Heather Rabbatts and includes Graeme Le Saux.
However, in 2012 Johnson refused to back the FA anti-homophobia campaign when discussing ethics and racism in the game on a television programme. When asked by the presenter Nicky Campbell during the BBC1 series The Big Questions if he would support the fight against homophobia, Johnson said: "Because of my beliefs, because of the Bible that I read, in the Bible it does state that homosexuality is detestable unto the Lord."
The FA advertised for six positions on the IAB in June last year, when the general secretary, Alex Horne, described the establishment of the board as "the first time that all parts of the game (the FA, Premier League, Football League, Professional Footballers' Association, League Managers Association, Professional Game Match Officials Limited and the Referees' Association) had come together with a comprehensive plan to promote inclusion and tackle discrimination in all its forms".
The FA was unaware of Johnson's comments when it took the decision to appoint the 40-year-old but this news represents fresh embarrassment for the organisation. John Amaechi, the first former NBA player to come out in public in 2007, joined Johnson on The Big Questions debate in March 2012 and told the Guardian that he does not believe the FA understands how to tackle homophobia, while the human rights and anti-homophobia campaigner Peter Tatchell said Johnson's appointment "makes a mockery of the FA's commitment to challenge prejudice".
Johnson, who is an ambassador for Birmingham children's hospital, was considered a viable candidate for the IAB because of his work on anti-racism. In a statement released to the Guardian, he insisted that he regretted his comments in 2012 and that his views on homosexuality had changed.
"I was invited on to the programme in March 2012 to talk about my faith. I was not prepared for the question and it is with deep regret that I answered it in the way I did back then. It was wrong and relates to a view I no longer hold," Johnson said.
"I have since invested a great deal of my time and energies into re-educating myself through reading, attending workshops and entering into debates. As a result, my whole way of thinking has changed. The Inclusion Advisory Board is all about education and changing opinions and, through my own personal experience and learning, I believe I can have a positive influence on the work being done by football on this vital agenda."
Rabbatts said: "I have spoken to Michael in detail about this and I accept his account of what happened and his regret over the incident. More importantly for me and for Michael, we acknowledge that through his own personal journey he has a huge amount to offer to the Inclusion Advisory Board."
The IAB will monitor the delivery of the FA's inclusion and anti-discrimination action plan for 2013-17, which aims to tackle under-representation in the game and states its backing for the government's charter for action against homophobia and transphobia.
Amaechi said: "The FA will say they have brought this man on because of his expertise in anti-racism. The problem is, the reason that homophobia, antisemitism, racism and other misogyny continue to blight football is that the FA does not understand how to tackle it. You don't put one person to handle racism and a gay person for homophobia, you pick people who understand that all bigotry is the same monster.
"I don't know this guy apart from shaking his hand at that TV programme, but I would say this – the problem here was not his religion, it was his interpretation of this. There are plenty of people who are religious who would have been ideal candidates for this board, who could have understood where their personal beliefs started and where human dignity begins," said Amaechi.
"The new quote from Michael Johnson is very welcome. It is good to see he has evolved as an individual. However I maintain that the FA's problems with women, BAME and LGBT communities come from choosing never to engage people who will challenge and educate them but rather insiders who qualify as part of the minority-issue they are trying to address. In general, they need more advice from scholars and less from former players, however well meaning."
Tatchell, who withdrew from the FA's working group against homophobia because he did not feel the organisation was taking the matter seriously, added: "The segment Michael Johnson appeared in was about racism in football. I hope his change of heart is genuine and sincere, if it is that's great.
"This still doesn't address the issue of whether the FA properly researched Johnson's views on tackling homophobia before he was appointed. They still have questions to answer about his appointment criteria and the procedure.
"The FA appears to have done no thorough research on their employees, it looks slapdash and unprofessional. The FA would never appoint a person who refused to support the campaign against racism. Why the double standards?"


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:07 pm 
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Former Aston Villa, West Ham and Everton midfielder Thomas Hitzlsperger has revealed he is gay.

The 31-year-old, who won 52 caps for Germany, made the announcement in newspaper Die Zeit.

He is only the fourth footballer to publicly reveal his homosexuality but said it was "a good time" to do so.

"I'm coming out about my homosexuality because I want to move the discussion about homosexuality among professional sportspeople forwards," he added.

The midfielder said he has only realised "in the past few years" that he would "prefer to live together with another man", adding: "I've never been ashamed of the way I am."

However, he said the issue is taboo inside the dressing room and it had not always been easy to live with some of the comments dished out on the subject.

"Just picture 20 men sat around a table together drinking - you've just got to let the majority be, just as long as the jokes are halfway funny and the talk about homosexuality doesn't get too insulting," he said.

High-profile athletes from other sports have openly discussed their sexuality in recent years, with Olympic diver Tom Daley revealing in December he was in a relationship with a man.

In February 2013, former United States and Leeds United winger Robbie Rogers said he was gay.

Swedish lower league player Anton Hysen, son of former Liverpool player Glenn Hysen, publicly announced his homosexuality in an interview with a Swedish football magazine in 2011.

And in 1990, former England Under-21 international Justin Fashanu was the first professional footballer in Britain to reveal he was gay. He took his own life eight years later, aged 37.

Hitzlsperger retired from the sport in September 2013 at the age of 31 after a series of injury problems.

He joined Villa as a teenager in 2000 from Bayern Munich and went on to play for Stuttgart, Lazio, West Ham and Wolfsburg, with a short stint at Everton before the end of his career.

It was during his five-year spell at Aston Villa that the Munich-born midfielder made his name and while at Villa Park he earned the nickname 'Der Hammer' because of his powerful left-foot shot.

Hitzlsperger also enjoyed a successful international career, making his first senior international bow in 2004.

He represented Germany at the 2006 World Cup - though he only played 11 minutes of that competition - and the 2008 European Championship, where he started in the quarter-final, semi-final and final.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 12:40 am 
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Former Aston Villa midfielder Thomas Hitzlsperger is the highest-profile footballer to reveal publicly he is gay - but retired basketball star John Amaechi doubts others will follow.

Amaechi, the first NBA player to come out, believes football's "toxic" culture is to blame, and must change. He tells BBC Sport why.

Coming out is better than being in the closet. Being authentic is better than being inauthentic. So I think it's good for Thomas Hitzlsperger to have come out. I'm sure his life will be considerably better as time moves forward.

Thomas Hitzlsperger speaks to BBC Radio 4's Today programme about his decision to come out, from 06:00 GMT on Thursday 9 January

It isn't a big deal for an awful lot of people, but within sport there is still a problem. The real problem, especially with football, is that it has never evaluated itself properly. The sport has never understood just how toxic it is.

Football is toxic and not just for gay people - it's toxic for Asians who want to play the game, it's toxic for women who want to be executives, it's toxic for black people who want to do anything but play. It's toxic in many different ways, but football doesn't see itself like that.

It sees itself as this amazing, wonderful, bold and progressive organisation. As an analogy, it is the fat bloke who looks at himself in the mirror and beaming back at him is an Adonis. It's a self-image that bears no resemblance on reality.

Footballers coming out at the highest level will happen only as the product of a cultural change within the game. It will not be the precursor to cultural change in football. If you want to see people being who they are, coming out and playing at their very best because they're able to be who they are, then the culture of football must change first.

That can be done if a remarkably small number of people who hold a remarkable amount of power can evolve.

Most companies have made the transition already. They understand that issues of inclusion are not about being nice, window dressing, PR and phrases such as Kick It Out.

Football is the Saatchi & Saatchi of sports organisations. It's really good at advertising campaigns and colourful posters. That's part of change, but the fundamentals are a bit more rigorous, functional, pragmatic and boring. Football is not doing those bits.

I've worked with multinational organisations that have made fundamental policy changes thorough education at every level, with senior executives who mean the change they're talking about. It's amazing that within two or three years, the organisation starts to shift radically. It attracts the very best people regardless of demographic.

Football's decision to stay in the dark ages - in terms of women in boardrooms, black people in management or executive positions and gay people anywhere - is just a statement that they don't want the very best people.

They don't want to change the status quo because they know that means new people, more women executives, more Asian players and executives, more difference. Football and sport are toxic to difference.

Football thinks bigotry exists in little compartments; that the causes are all separate monsters they have to fight one at a time. They've opted to fight the racism monster first and then they'll move on to the next one.

But bigotry is a Hydra. It has many heads. You can go swiping at those heads as much as you want - they will just multiply. You have to kill the ignorance and myths at the centre of that monster in order to destroy it.

Generally, it just need 10-15% of an organisation to lead well and the rest will follow. Fans will follow if properly led.

Coming out is challenging for anybody. Coming out to yourself is a challenge for many. Coming out to families and people who love you is very difficult. When you add on top of that the challenge of coming out to complete strangers - who are then going to go on Twitter and call you the 'F' word - you suddenly realise that even in 2014, it is still a challenging thing.

I give the same advice to all people who are considering coming out. You should come out if it's safe. If you can come out and you know that your team-mates are going to be supportive, if you know your club will be supportive, that your management will be supportive and your family will be supportive, then do it.

Being out is better than being in. Being yourself makes everything a bit more rosy.


So once again I ask where are the gay athletes in other sports? Maybe it's just a case that the macho all male environment of competitive sport makes it difficult for a man to reveal his sexuality to his colleagues. This is not a situation specific to football and until an active player comes out in England we don't know how everyone will react I imagine most will tread lightly. I have to admit I haven't check on the general response to this guy coming out but everything I've seen on twitter is positive and many share my view that it just simply isn't news.

These issues are not footballs problems they are societies problem and while football can be used as a tool to help break down barriers it cannot be the driving force behind this that has to come from government. How does Ameachi know what the FA are doing to promote diversity and encourage Asian kids to play football or women to get involved in the running of clubs? Karen Brady is a director at West Ham and most people respect the fact she does a good job and we have numerous foreign owners from all over the world running our clubs normally with people from their own country being on the board.

This guy made big steps and he is obviously using football as a tool to raise awareness as it's our national game but for me unless he's gone and done the research on these sort of issues how can he really criticise?

For me professional sport in this country remains the one true meritocracy where you are judged only on your ability if an active player came out as gay and he happened to be your star striker I get the feeling managers/players/fans would just deal with it if he is some lad in the youth team it might be a bit more of an issue. That is the reality of football or any other sport where people make money off your ability you can basically do what you want if you break the law and go to prison chances are a club will pick you up when you come out if you're a good player.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2014 3:04 pm 
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More than half of Premier League clubs have signed up to a 'Football v Homophobia' campaign.

More than half of Premier League clubs have signed up to a 'Football v Homophobia' campaign.

Eleven clubs - Arsenal, Aston Villa, Chelsea, Crystal Palace, Everton, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United, Stoke, Sunderland and West Ham - have already signed up.

However, only 16 of the 72 Football League clubs have so far joined the campaign.

The month of action was launched at UptonPark last weekend, where West Ham's players donned 'FvH' T-shirts.

Hammers skipper Kevin Nolan said: "For us as players and role models, we all recognise the importance of the Football v Homophobia campaign.

"We're passionate about supporting this and we hope that it sends out a message that there is no place for discrimination in football, nor in any sport."

There are no openly gay players in English professional football - former English based players Thomas Hitzlsperger and Robbie Rogers have come out but only leaving this country.

Sports minister Helen Grant has backed the campaign, saying: "Football v Homophobia is raising the awareness of important issues and provides ways for everyone in football to get involved.

"We hope everyone in the game will continue their support by taking action with the campaign."

Campaign director Lou Englefield added: "This isn't just about players coming out. It's about all of us - including heterosexual players and fans who attend matches week in week out - being willing to speak out and take visible action to challenge prejudice in the game."


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:24 pm 
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Players should receive more education to combat homophobia, according to former Professional Footballers' Association chairman Clarke Carlisle.

Carlisle told BBC Radio 5 live that homophobic language has long been commonplace in dressing rooms.

The 34-year-old admitted using it himself before changing his ways and starting to challenge others.

Former Bolton boss Owen Coyle told the programme attitudes to homosexuality have barely changed in 20 years.

Carlisle and Coyle were addressing the issue in the week that England women's captain Casey Stoney spoke publicly about being gay for the first time.

In the men's game, there have been no openly gay footballers playing professionally in England since Justin Fashanu in 1990.

Former Aston Villa midfielder Thomas Hitzlsperger retired before he revealed he was gay in January, while former Leeds winger Robbie Rogers also hung up his boots last year before returning to play for David Beckham's former team, LA Galaxy.

Carlisle, who played for a host of clubs - including Blackpool, QPR and Burnley - before retiring in 2013, said football dressing rooms would not be an easy place to be openly gay.

"I've used the language that now I would be really disgusted to hear," Carlisle, who was PFA chairman from 2010 to 2013, told the 5 live special, which airs on Thursday at 21:00 GMT.

"I used it really flippantly, maybe thinking it was banter.

"But it was only by awareness and interaction and actually understanding the effect and power of the words that I was using on someone who is homosexual that I got an understanding and started to address my base-level language use.

"That progressed to being able to be in a dressing room over the last three years of my career and actually being able to challenge others."

Coyle was a team-mate of Fashanu's at Airdrie in the early 1990s, not long after the former Norwich striker had revealed he was gay.

"I'm totally amazed that there has not been a follow-up in terms of players being able to be comfortable," he said.

"I think we can understand why because of the stigmas and everything involved but I just thought when he did that at the time there would be a follow-on and it never really came about."


Until someone comes out we wont really know how dressing rooms/fans will react to it I would imagine most people will just get on with it as I wouldn't be surprised if footballers knew someone who was gay/lesbian and apart from extreme religious views held by some people there isn't really an logical reason to dislike some for their sexuality.

It would also depend on the personality of that person I know a football dressing room can be a tough place when it comes to "banter" but I imagine most players know a persons limit just like I do with my work colleagues or friends. There are certain things we do joke about and there are other that we don't but educating footballers is not the way to deal with "problem" you need to educate society as football mirrors society.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 12:38 am 
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I know I know it's a different kind of "football" but NFL prospect Micheal Sam has come out as gay. It'll be an interesting test for the league as mock drafts have him going anywhere from the 3rd-7th round, but they all have him being drafted.

Announymus executives have been quoted by sports illustrated saying it's going to hurt his draft stock and that it'll unbalance a locker room, which quite frankly, is all bullsh!t IMO.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 12:54 am 
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This is from some newscast in Texas it's come a bit viral since it hit the inter webs over here


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 9:30 am 
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The James wrote:
I know I know it's a different kind of "football" but NFL prospect Micheal Sam has come out as gay. It'll be an interesting test for the league as mock drafts have him going anywhere from the 3rd-7th round, but they all have him being drafted.

Announymus executives have been quoted by sports illustrated saying it's going to hurt his draft stock and that it'll unbalance a locker room, which quite frankly, is all bullsh!t IMO.


I saw that and fair play to the lad for doing it before the draft knowing full well that it might effect his career prospects.

The way I see it is in professional sport you're judged by what you do on the field if you perform on the pitch you can basically do what you want there is no moral code when it comes to athletes as long as your clean (in terms of drugs) and you help the team win they'll pretty much excuse anything.

You only have to look at our football leagues to see convicted killers, people who have beaten up wives, gone to prison for assualt, been caught using racist language etc still getting careers in football because if you're good at your job people will employ you.

That video you put up is spot on would be awesome if someone did something similar over here in support and I'm sure they would if we had an openly gay footballer.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 3:28 pm 
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Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger says a gay Premier League footballer may never be able to reveal his sexuality during his playing career because of the intense scrutiny he would be under.

Former Aston Villa midfielder Thomas Hitzlsperger came out earlier this year after his retirement from the sport.

"Because of media interest, maybe no-one will come out," said Wenger.

"He could not come out during his career which means we still have some progress to make in our game."

Wenger's comments echo those made by former Leeds player Robbie Rodgers, who said it was "impossible" to contemplate coming out and remaining in football. Like Hitzlsperger, Rodgers came out after bringing his playing career to a close.

Lower down the football pyramid, semi-professional player Liam Davis has come out and continued his playing career.

And in women's football, Casey Stoney has continued to play at the top level for Arsenal Ladies and England after revealing her sexuality earlier this year.

Wenger, talking to Arsenal Magazine about the issue of homophobia in football, said the day when a player's sexuality was not an issue in football was still a long way off.

"Hitzlsperger should not have had to wait until the end," he added.

"But overall he should not have to come out at all because it should just be considered like anything else.

"It would be good if four, five, six people come out and after that nobody speaks about it anymore because they just think it is people who live their life like they want to live it.

"I think football is there to provoke moments of happiness, excitement and positive experiences in people, no matter where they come from, what colour skin they have, what religion they are or what their preferred sexuality is.

"It's very sad that some people think that this sport should only be reserved for those who have certain characteristics. It's open to everybody who loves football and when that doesn't happen, it's not acceptable."

A survey carried out by Europe's leading gay equality charity, Stonewall, which polled over 30,000 fans from 29 countries, found that Irish football supporters would be the most accepting of a player in their national team coming out as homosexual, with 83% saying they were comfortable with the idea.

Sweden and Denmark followed next with 79% ahead of the United Kingdom with 73%, while this summer's World Cup host nation Brazil came sixth (67%).

Supporters from Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates (both 7%) had the lowest acceptance rates of such a scenario.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:11 pm 
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The UK government is to hold an inquiry into the issue of homophobia in sport.

The Culture, Media and Sport Committee is planning to investigate the different experiences of men and women across a range of sports.

An inquiry into racism in football four years ago found homophobia was emerging as a bigger problem than other forms of discrimination.

"It is clear homophobia remains a serious issue," said Culture, Media and Sport Committee chair Jesse Norman.

"We are particularly interested in looking at the possible differences between sports, and sports governing bodies, and between the experiences of sportsmen and sportswomen."

There are no openly gay male professional footballers in England or Scotland and the inquiry will hear opinions on why athletes may be fearful of being open about their sexuality.

The public can submit written submissions on the issue before the deadline of 29 April, 2016.


I really don't understand why this keeps raising it's head no player has come out in English football while playing and I honestly believe after a brief adjustment period everyone will just get on with it. Obviously a dressing room is a very macho place but that's because these are intensely competitive people that's how they've made it to the top there's nothing to suggest an openly gay man wouldn't have the same competitive personality.

The only issue will be if there are gay players who are scared to come out and keep it a secret as they're well within their rights to do but I genuinely believe football sees no race, religion or sexuality you are judged purely by fans on your ability. Good players get away with whatever they want bad players don't sadly that's just the way it works


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 2:02 pm 
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The hope among us all is that Andre Gray is indeed a changed man. The swift apology for explicit, historic homophobic comments made on social media must be taken at face value, for we have no other choice. You can examine the semantics of those six paragraphs if you wish, but ultimately that achieves nothing. Our society affords second chances, and that is to be celebrated.

Yet Gray, waking up on Sunday morning a Premier League goalscorer but also a possible pariah, must realise that an apology is the beginning, not the end, of this story. The views he stated were not playground taunts, but deeply offensive slurs. ‘Makes me sick’, ‘die’ and ‘burn’ are the buzzwords not just of ignorance, but outright incitement of homophobic violence. This is the language of hate crime.

“While these tweets are of course historic, unfortunately homophobic attitudes and language continue to be an issue in sport, whether that’s on the pitch, in the terraces or on social media,” campaign group Stonewall told the BBC. “It’s extremely important that we work together to kick these attitudes out of sport and create supportive and inclusive environments that enable everyone to feel accepted without exception.”

The importance of highlighting Gray’s words is not to ruin the career of a player, but to stress the difficulties the LGBT community continues to face in gaining acceptance in football in 2016. Great strides have been made by Stonewall, Football v Homophobia and the like, but barriers are still placed in their way.

English football has been slow to make progress. Racism will never again be tolerated, but there still exists an element of entrenched homophobia, partly related to the testosterone-fuelled culture of the game but also the unacceptable equation of homophobic teasing as ‘banter’.

Former manager Alan Smith recalls how players in his teams who were single and read books were regular called “gay” by teammates. Thomas Hitzlsperger remembers “a table with 20 young men and listening to jokes about gays” before he came out after retiring in 2013. Outright hatred? No. Damaging? Of course.

In 2005, BBC 5Live asked all Premier League managers their opinions on tackling homophobia by answering three questions regarding the game’s treatment of LGBT issues, and not one agreed to take part in the investigation. In 2009, the Football Association set up a Tackling Homophobia Working Group, but several key members were removed after a lack of effective progress. In 2010, an anti-homophobia video was pulled weeks before release amid fear it was too hard-hitting.

Incidents such as Gray’s threaten to add roadblocks on the journey to acceptance. Four years is a long time, as Gray himself is keen to point out, but that doesn’t heal the wounds of his words. If the striker was not an influential social media figure in 2012, when he played for Luton Town in non-league, he is now. Continue his Premier League form and there will be calls for international recognition. With that comes responsibility, whether he likes it or not. And yes, that means atoning for past wrongs.

Gray’s future actions must now speak far louder than those past words, if we are truly to change the prevailing attitudes that still exist in English football, from grassroots to Premier League. ‘Anything which stops people participating and enjoying the national game of football has to be tackled and eradicated,’ as the FA’s own guidelines state, but that fails to be mirrored in reality. English football is still not a place where its competitors and stakeholders can truly be proud of their sexuality without fear of discrimination. Homophobia is the last terrace taboo.

Rather than making Gray a pariah, let’s make him a poster boy for change. Rather than focus on his 2012 views, let’s embrace his 2016 attitude. Rather than punishment, let him educate. If Gray truly has changed, he will be deeply embarrassed and regretful of those insensitive and repugnant views, and keen to demonstrate his new attitude of acceptance.

In May this year, Burnley hosted the first ever Pride event in East Lancashire, an event that will be repeated in May 2017. It would be nice to believe that Gray will lend his full support.

Daniel Storey


At least Grey has owned up to what he did rather than try to come up with some clever excuse about his account being hacked or some bullsh*t like that he's obviously grown up a bit since he said those things and his views have changed


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 11:58 am 
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Premier League players would still suffer "significant abuse" if they chose to reveal they are gay, Football Association chairman Greg Clarke has warned.

Clarke was answering Commons Select Committee questions at the government's governance of football inquiry.

"I'm cautious of encouraging people to come out until we do our part of the bargain and stamp out abuse," he said.

"I am personally ashamed they don't feel safe to come out."

Justin Fashanu became the first player in England to come out as gay in 1990, but took his own life aged 37 in 1998. No male professional player has come out while playing in England since.

Former Germany and Aston Villa player Thomas Hitzlsperger became the first player with Premier League experience to publicly reveal his homosexuality, in January 2014, after he had finished playing in England.

Former England women's captain Casey Stoney was the first active footballer to come out in England since Fashanu, in February 2014.

"I would be amazed if we haven't got gay players in the Premier League," Clarke added.

Clarke was questioned about a Daily Mirror article from 2015 that claimed two Premier League players, including an England international, had been preparing to come out.

The Mirror also alleged a Premier League player came out to his team-mates in 2011, but did not go public after a homophobic slur was painted on his car.

Clarke, 49, denied knowing the identity of the players - and told the committee members he would not name them even if he did.

Clarke also cited the weekend's League Two fixture between Leyton Orient and Luton Town, at which homophobic chanting was reported, saying he would "come down like a tonne of bricks" on anyone found guilty.

"If I was a gay man, why would I expose myself to that?" Clarke asked.

"Before we encourage people to come out we must provide the safe space where they have the expectation to play or watch football and not get abused.

"There's a very small minority of people who hurl vile abuse at people who they perceive are different. Our job is to stamp down hard on their behaviour."

Asked what would happen if a Premier League player came out, Clarke said: "There would be significant abuse because we haven't cracked the problem.

"I was at Egham Town v St Albans in the FA Cup. There were about 300 people and everybody knew everybody else, there was no vile abuse.

"When you're in a big crowd, you're anonymous and the bad people get brave.

"The good news is we're not in denial. We may not have figured out how to crack it yet but there's a deep loathing of that sort of behaviour within football."

Clarke said he would next week attend his first FA inclusion advisory board, which provides guidance on all equality matters.


Until one decides to come out we'll never know how people will react my guess is IF one is currently playing he probably doesn't want the hassle of having that tag around his neck because it will bring so much more attention to his life and everything he does and with the media the way it is in this country my guess is players enjoy being anonymous when it comes to their personal lives.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:05 pm 
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Three players are in contact with the Football Association about coming out as gay, according to MP John Nicolson.

He made the comments during a Department of Culture, Media and Sport hearing into homophobia in sport.

In October, FA chairman Greg Clarke told MPs that Premier League players would suffer "significant abuse" if they chose to reveal they are gay.

Speaking to Nicolson, sports minister Tracey Crouch said "there has never been a better time" to come out.

She told MPs that Clarke's comments were "incredibly disappointing" and "strange", adding: "If someone were to decide to come out, they should feel like they are being supported by the authorities and that any abuse would be tackled."

In response, Nicolson said that Clarke had been invited back to present an action plan to MPs, because it was "not good enough" to say an openly gay player would suffer abuse.

"I understand three players are in talks with the FA about coming out and they haven't done so yet," said Scottish National Party MP Nicolson. "It's good to know that you're encouraging people to come out."

Justin Fashanu became the first player in England to come out as gay in 1990, but took his own life aged 37 in 1998. No male professional player has come out while playing in England since.

Former Germany and Aston Villa player Thomas Hitzlsperger became the first player with Premier League experience to publicly reveal his homosexuality, in January 2014, after he had finished playing in England.

Former England women's captain Casey Stoney was the first active footballer to come out in England since Fashanu, in February 2014.

In October, a BBC Radio 5 live study found that 82% of football supporters would have no issue with their club signing a gay player.

However, 8% of fans said they would stop watching their team.


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 Post subject: Re: Would A Gay Footballer Bother You?
PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 2:21 pm 
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Football Association chairman Greg Clarke says he has spoken to gay footballers and suggested they come out collectively rather than on their own.

Clarke said in October that Premier League players may suffer "significant abuse" if they revealed they were gay.

A BBC Radio 5 live survey in October found 8% of fans would stop watching their team if they signed a gay player.

Clarke told The Times: "If a number of top-level pros want to come out, why don't we synchronise it?"

Clarke added that any announcements could be made when the fans were in a more positive mood.

"The Premier League, the English Football League and FA could do it at the start of the season. At the start, everybody thinks it's their season, the crowds are happy, the sun is shining," he continued.

"I was asked if football is ready for top-level pros to come out and I said I'm not sure we were.

"There was a survey which said people would support gay people in their own team, but I'm worried about what they would say about gay people in the other team."

Justin Fashanu became the first player in England to come out as gay in 1990, but took his own life in 1998, aged 37. No male professional player has since come out while playing in England since.

Clarke said he did not want to persuade any players to reveal their sexuality.

"It is very difficult to get a representative set of gay top-level footballers because some of them are happy with their sexuality and don't want anyone to know," he added.

"I don't want to be part of a process that says, 'You've got to come out.' That's not right. People are cautious. Once you're out of the closet, you're out."


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